Apples new iPod Touch gets A10 Fusion chip starts at 199

first_imgApple brings the iPod Touch up to date with the newest release. Apple Apple released a new iPod Touch on Tuesday, saying it makes frequently used features like FaceTime perform better. The device uses Apple’s A10 Fusion chip to boost gameplay and to offer an “immersive AR experience” for the first time on the iPod Touch, according to a statement. The AR feature work across gaming and education apps and web browsing. The device’s chip has most recently has been used in the 2018 iPad. Apple $219 Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 Apple iPod Touch 2015 Mentioned Above Apple iPod Touch 2015 (16GB – blue) See it See All Share your voice CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Walmart The new iPod Touch is available in space gray, white, gold, blue, pink and red on Apple.com as of Tuesday and in stores later this week. Prices start at $199 for the 32GB model, $299 for the 128GB version and $399 for the 256GB model. It comes with a 4-inch Retina display, an 8-megapixel camera and a 1.2-megapixel front-facing camera. It runs iOS 12 and includes a headphone jack.”We’re making the most affordable iOS device even better with performance that is twice as fast as before, Group FaceTime and augmented reality starting at just $199,” Greg Joswiak, Apple’s vice president of product marketing, said in a statement. Group FaceTime allows up to 32 people to join a video or audio call over Wi-Fi. Unlike an iPhone, an iPod Touch doesn’t make traditional phone calls or require a wireless subscription.See new iPod Touch at Apple(Note that CNET may get a share of the revenue if you buy anything featured on our site.)The last time Apple updated the iPod Touch was 2015. The revamp made the device more similar to iPhone 6 with an 8-megapixel camera. Apple retired the iPod Nano and the Shuffle in 2017. At the same time, Apple slashed iPod Touch prices and reduced storage capacity options. Originally published May 28 at 5:53 a.m. PT.Update, 6:31 a.m.: Adds background on iPod Touch updates. 3:38 13center_img Thoughts on the Apple iPod Touch refresh • Mobile Mobile Review • Apple iPod Touch review: 2015 specs packed into a tiny 2012 body $132 Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Now playing: Watch this: reading • Apple’s new iPod Touch gets A10 Fusion chip, starts at $199 See It Comments Tags Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Applelast_img read more

Once A Critic Perry Now A Defender Of Energy Department

first_imgAssociated PressIn this April 10, 2017 file photo, Energy Secretary Rick Perry speaks with a woman ahead of a G7 Energy meeting in Rome. Since becoming President Donald Trump’s energy secretary, Perry has kept a low profile and rarely has been seen publicly around Washington. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino, File)Rick Perry twice ran for president and appeared as a contestant on “Dancing with the Stars.”But since becoming President Donald Trump’s energy secretary, Perry has kept a low profile and rarely has been seen publicly around Washington. Comedian Hasan Minhaj joked at the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner that Perry must be “sitting in a room full of plutonium waiting to become Spider-Man. That’s just my hunch.”In truth, Perry has been busy — but far away from the capital.He has toured Energy Department sites around the country, represented the Trump administration at a meeting in Italy and pledged to investigate a tunnel collapse at a radioactive waste storage site in Washington state.Perry has visited a shuttered nuclear waste dump at Nevada’s Yucca Mountain and cautiously began a yearslong process to revive it.On Thursday, Perry embarked on a nine-day trip to Asia, where he planned to check on the progress made since a 2011 nuclear meltdown in Fukushima, Japan, and reaffirm the U.S. commitment to help decontaminate and decommission damaged nuclear reactors. Perry also was to represent the United States at a clean energy meeting in Beijing.The former Texas governor says he’s having the time of his life running an agency he once pledged to eliminate. Perry has emerged as a strong defender of the department’s work, especially the 17 national labs that conduct cutting-edge research on everything from national security to renewable energy.“I’m telling you officially the coolest job I’ve ever had is being secretary of energy … and it’s because of these labs,” the 67-year-old Perry told an audience last month at Idaho National Laboratory, one of several he has visited since taking office in March.“If you work at a national lab … you are making a difference,” Perry said.The energy chief soon will have a chance to back up those words when he and other officials head to Capitol Hill to defend a budget proposal that slashes funding for science, renewables and energy efficiency.Perry probably will be asked to defend Trump’s decision to withdraw from the landmark Paris climate accord. Perry said Thursday that the U.S. remains committed to clean energy and is confident officials can “drive economic growth and protect the environment at the same time.”The administration has called for cutting the Office of Science, which includes 10 national labs, by 17 percent. The proposed budget would reduce spending for renewable and nuclear energy, eliminate the popular Energy Star program to enhance efficiency and gut an agency that promotes research and development of advanced energy technologies.Perry, who served 14 years as Texas governor, likened the spending plan to an opening offer that he expects to see significantly changed in Congress.“I will remind you this is not my first rodeo when it comes to budgeting,” he said during a recent tour of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee.“Hopefully we will be able to make that argument to our friends in Congress that what DOE is involved with plays a vital role, not only in the security of America but the economic well-being of the country as we go forward,” he said.Energy lobbyist Frank Maisano said Perry’s actions show instincts honed in his tenure as Texas’s longest-serving governor.“He’s trying to find out what he needs to find out — hearing about these issues from the front lines,” Maisano said.While Perry will never match the scientific expertise of his most recent predecessors at the Energy Department, nuclear physicists Steven Chu and Ernest Moniz, his political skills may offset that knowledge gap, Maisano said.During his Oak Ridge visit, Perry pledged to be “a strong advocate” for Oak Ridge and other labs. He has spoken out in favor of renewable energy such as wind and solar power, noting that while he was governor, Texas maintained its traditional role as a top driller for oil and natural gas, and emerged as the leading producer of wind power in the United States and a top 10 provider of solar power.Abigail Hopper, president and CEO of the Solar Energy Industries Association, said she had “a very positive conversation” with Perry at a meeting in April.“He was very interested in our technology and how it can be utilized,” she said in an interview.Perry also “knew exactly where Texas was in solar installation,” Hopper said — No. 9 in the nation, compared with its top ranking among wind-producing states.Hopper, a former Interior Department official under President Barack Obama, said she and Perry did not discuss her federal service — but did talk about how national labs can boost the solar industry.“It was good to make that connection between the research and how it translates into the marketplace,” she said. “He gets it.” Sharelast_img read more

UofL Basketball Names Trio of Captains for 201920

first_imgWilliams started the last 20 games of the season while producing four double-doubles.  He was third on the team in rebounding and 19th in the ACC, averaging 6.1 rebounds and 7.7 points for the season.  The 6-11 junior from Fort Wayne, Ind., blocked a shot in 26 of 34 games as a sophomore and ranked 11th in the ACC in blocked shots (41 total, 1.2 average).  He grabbed a career-best 13 boards against both North Carolina and Notre Dame.  He averaged 9.8 points and 8.4 rebounds over the last five games of the season.  LOUISVILLE, Ky. — University of Louisville redshirt senior guard Ryan McMahon, redshirt senior forward Dwayne Sutton and junior forward/center Malik Williams have been selected as team captains for the 2019-20 men’s basketball season by a vote of their teammates. “Dwayne, Malik and Ryan have earned the vote of their teammates to be elected captains,” said UofL Head Coach Chris Mack.  “It’s clear that their efforts and actions in the offseason have gained the respect of their teammates.  Leadership on any team is highly important and it’s especially key with so many new faces on our roster this season.  I think each of them understands what it means to be a captain and are honored that their peers have chosen them.” Story Links The trio of captains helped Louisville achieve a 20-14 record in 2018-19 and participate in the Cardinals’ 39th NCAA Tournament.  Picked in the preseason to finish 11th in the ACC, UofL attained a 10-8 conference record and earned a tie for sixth in the final regular season standings.  The Cardinals return six of their top seven scorers from last year and welcome a top 10 recruiting class.   The Cardinals have been ranked among the nation’s top teams in multiple early rankings by national outlets, including the following:  No. 2 by Jon Rothstein, CBS Sports; No. 3 by Jeff Goodman, Stadium; No. 4 by Gary Parrish, CBSSports.com; No. 4 by Jeremy Woo, Sports Illustrated; No. 5 by Jeff Borzello, ESPN.com; No. 5 by Seth Davis, The Athletic; No. 6 by Rob Dauster, NBCSports.com; No. 6 by Mike Rutherford, SB Nation; No. 6 by Kyle Kensing, Athlon Sports; No. 8 by David Kenyon, Bleacher Report; and No. 11 by Mike DeCourcy, The Sporting News.Louisville has received an NCAA Public Recognition Award six of the last seven years for ranking among the top 10 percent in men’s basketball in the Academic Progress Rate (APR), which measures academic eligibility, retention and graduation for student-athletes. Louisville is one of just nine Division I schools in the nation, including only two from Power Five conferences (Louisville and Stanford), which have earned the APR recognition in at least six of the last seven years. McMahon, who earned his bachelor’s degree in marketing in the spring, hit a three-pointer in 24 of 34 games last season.  Fifty-three of McMahon’s 68 field goals last year came from three-point range. The 6-0 sharpshooter from Sarasota, Fla., has 15 career double-figure scoring efforts, including when he scored a career-high 24 points against Michigan State last season.  He led the Cardinals in free throw percentage last year (.950, 57-of-60) and was third on the team with 60 assists.  UofL is 23-5 when McMahon scores eight or more points over the last three years.    Print Friendly Version Sutton, who graduated in the spring with a bachelor’s degree in sport administration, started all 34 games for the Cardinals last season while averaging 10.0 points (third on the team) and 6.9 rebounds (second on the team, 16th in the ACC).  He was noted as one of the nation’s top ten “Glue Guys” last season by College Insider Jon Rothstein.  The 6-5 wing from Louisville who played his freshman year at UNC Asheville enters his final season with 901 collegiate points (493 at UofL) and 639 rebounds (377 at UofL).  He was 25th in the ACC in minutes played, averaging 31.4 per game.last_img read more

Observing matterwave diffraction from a periodic array of half planes

first_img “Our experiment is based on the wave–particle duality, which is a basic concept in quantum mechanics,” Wieland Schöllkopf, one of the researchers who carried out the study, told Phys.org. “The idea that microscopic particles such as electrons, neutrons, atoms or even molecules exhibit wave-like behavior dates back to the 1920s, when Louis de Broglie introduced the particle wavelength, which today is referred to as the ‘de Broglie wavelength.'” Since de Broglie first developed his theory, researchers have carried out numerous experiments observing diffraction and interference, two wave phenomena that cannot be explained in a particle picture. The main aim of the study carried out by Schöllkopf and his colleagues was to investigate novel matter-wave diffraction methods that allow for coherent manipulation of atomic and molecular beams. “We observed diffraction of He atoms and D2 molecules scattering off from a grating structure,” Schöllkopf explained. “The latter is formed by a periodic array of polymer film structured on a gold-coated glass substrate. A variety of grating structures, all with identical period, but differing in the width of the polymer stripes, were made at UNIST in Ulsan, Korea. These gratings were used in the diffraction apparatus at the Fritz-Haber-Institut in Berlin, Germany.” The apparatus at the Fritz-Haber-Institut allowed the researchers to generate an intense beam of He or D2 with extremely narrow angular divergence. The generated beam is incident to the grating under grazing conditions, hence, the particles’ velocity component perpendicular to the grating surface is very small. “In previous experiments carried out at our lab, we have observed coherent reflection and diffraction from a grating structure under grazing incidence conditions,” Schöllkopf said. “This was attributed to ‘quantum reflection,’ which is a reflection mechanism different from classical reflection.” In classical reflection, as atoms or molecules approach a surface, they are affected by the atom-surface van der Waals force. This force leads to an acceleration towards the surface, with the particle ultimately bouncing off from the surface. On the other hand, in quantum reflection, the atoms or molecules already bounce back from the region in space dominated by the van der Waals force. Researchers at Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), in Korea, and Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, in Germany, have recently conducted a study investigating matter-wave diffraction from a periodic array of half planes. Their paper, published on Physical Review Letters (PRL), reports on the reflection and diffraction of He and D2 beams from square-wave gratings of a 400−μm period and strip widths ranging from 10 to 200 μm at grazing-incidence conditions. Explore further A schematic picture of half-plane array diffraction. Credit: Lee et al. More information: Ju Hyeon Lee et al. Matter-Wave Diffraction from a Periodic Array of Half Planes, Physical Review Letters (2019). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.122.040401Hilmar Oberst et al. Fresnel Diffraction Mirror for an Atomic Wave, Physical Review Letters (2005). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.94.013203 A third reflection mechanism, which differs from classical and quantum reflection, is based on the diffraction of the de Broglie waves of atoms or molecules from the edges of half planes, which are very narrow ridges on a surface. This mechanism, first observed in Japan by Prof. Shimizu and his colleagues, is now referred to as “Fresnel diffraction mirror” due to its analogy with the edge diffraction of light waves in optics. In their study, Schöllkopf and his colleagues observed fully resolved matter-wave diffraction patterns, including specular reflection and diffracted beams up to the second diffraction order. They also found that as strip width decreased, diffraction efficiencies transformed from the known regime of quantum reflection to the regime of edge diffraction. “In our experiment, we observed the transition from quantum reflection for relatively large widths of the grating stripes to the regime at small stripe widths where edge diffraction dominates,” Schöllkopf said. “Furthermore, in addition to the specular (mirror-like) reflection seen previously, we observed intense grating diffraction beams up to second order.”The experimental findings collected by the researchers confirm a previously developed single-parameter model, which is commonly used to describe a variety of phenomena, including quantum billiards, scattering of radio waves in urban areas and the reflection of matter waves from microstructures. Moreover, their observations suggest that neither classical nor quantum reflection mechanisms are essential for the reflective diffraction of matter waves from a structured solid, as this can result exclusively from half-plane edge diffraction. “Our observations allowed us to make a quantitative analysis of the reflection and diffraction efficiencies,” Bum Suk Zhao from UNIST, the principle investigator of the study, told Phys.org. “This, in turn, allowed for an experimental test of the Bogomolny-Schmit model of half-plane array diffraction. According to this model description the phenomenon is fully scalable with respect to the wavelength and the dimensions of the half-plane array. As a result, for a given incidence angle, the scattering of atomic matter waves of 1 nm de Broglie wavelength from a 4-μm-period array of parallel half planes shows identical diffraction effects as, e.g., the scattering of 1-cm-wavelength radio waves off buildings separated by 40 m.” The study conducted by Schöllkopf, Zhao and their colleagues provides a clear confirmation of the Bogomolny-Schmit model. In the future, their findings could also be used as a test bench for models of quantum reflection from microstructured surfaces that need to account for half-plane edge diffraction. In their next studies, the researchers plan to apply half-plane array diffraction to the investigation of weakly bound molecules, such as the He dimer and trimer.”Due to their extremely small binding energies, these di- and triatomic helium molecules are not amenable to many experimental tools,” Bum Suk Zhao explained. “For instance, classical scattering of He2 from a solid surface will inevitably lead to break-up. To overcome these limitations, more experimental techniques allowing for non-destructive manipulation of these species are needed. Half-plane array diffraction is a well suited method for this purpose.” ‘Meta-mirror’ reflects sound waves in any direction Journal information: Physical Review Letters “This counter-intuitive quantum effect of attractive forces, effectively resulting in recoil of the particle, can only be observed if the incident velocity in the direction perpendicular to the surface is very small,” Schöllkopf explained. “This is why, in our experiment, we can only observe quantum reflection at near grazing incidence conditions.” © 2019 Science X Network Citation: Observing matter-wave diffraction from a periodic array of half planes (2019, February 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-02-matter-wave-diffraction-periodic-array-planes.html A photograph of the research team taken inside a lab at Fritz-Haber-Institute, in Berlin. Credit: Lee et al. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Big Savings on a Big TV Plus Deals on a Fast Coffee

first_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. September 12, 2016 Register Now » Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Entrepreneur has affiliate partnership with TechBargains so we may get a share of the revenue from your purchase.Thanks to our friends at TechBargains, we’ve rounded up some can’t-miss deals. Check it out:60″ Vizio D-Series 1080p 120Hz LED Smart HDTV + $250 Dell Gift Card for $649.99This is a big-screen TV deal as good as we expect to see on Black Friday. You get a huge $250 Dell gift card you can use on any numbers of other consoles, headphones, or even home automation stuff at Dell … and you get a huge, well-reviewed Vizio TV. This is the perfect timing to get a big-screen TV with 120Hz as the football season has started, basketball is just around the corner and we are coming up on the end of the baseball season. Travelpro Crew 10 Expandable 21″ Carryon Spinner Luggage for $126.99 (Orig. $159.99)There are tons of less expensive luggage out there but this is a top-rated carry-on by the WireCutter and they found it to be one of the best carryons you can get. It is significantly less expensive than their No. 1 $250 suitcase from the same manufacturer. It shares many design features and high-quality zippers and wheels as their $250 bag. It includes handy features for travel such as a built-in garment folder to prevent wrinkles to nice clothing and their easy to direct MagnaTrac wheels which automatically lock into place. We bought one of these and couldn’t be happier. iRobot Roomba 870 Vacuuming Robot for $419 (Orig. $599.99)Today only Amazon is offering 30 percent off one of their higher-end Roombas. This has more cleaning power than less expensive ones with a more powerful motor and Roomba’s AeroForce 3-stage cleaning system. This is the lowest price we’ve ever seen this model and it normally goes on sale for $530 at stores like Target. Bunn NHS Velocity 10-Cup Coffee Brewer for $77 (Orig. $129.99)If you need to make a ton of coffee in a hurry then the Bunn Velocity Brew will make enough quickly enough to keep pace with your coffee-pounding habits. Many reviews call it the fastest drip coffee maker they’ve seen and it doesn’t compromise on the brew like less expensive brands. Bowflex SelectTech 552 Adjustable Dumbbells for $279.99 (Orig. $399.99)Combine 15 sets of weights into one set of dumbbells with Bowflex’s selecttech technology. Simply turn the dial and select the weight (up to 52 pounds) on the dumbbell and start lifting. This is a huge space saver and typically a set of these will cost closer to $400. For more great deals, check out our TechBargains Small Business page. Disclosure: This is brought to you by the Entrepreneur Partner Studio. Our goal is to feature products and services that we think you’ll find interesting and useful. If you purchase them, we may get a small share of the revenue from the sale from our commerce partners.Have a deal you want to promote? Contact us here. 3 min read Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Globallast_img read more

IAG confirms plans to acquire struggling Niki

Share Tags: British Airways, Iberia, Low-Cost Carriers TORONTO — International Airlines Group (IAG), parent company of British Airways and Iberia, is moving forward with plans to acquire the assets of struggling low-cost carrier Niki, which opened insolvency procedures in Austria last week.IAG announced plans last month for a subsidiary of Vueling to buy the Austrian airline’s assets for 20 million euros, plus invest another 16.5 million euros into the company. Niki was part of the airberlin group, which entered liquidation last year.Germany’s Lufthansa was also in the running to purchase Niki, but withdrew its bid in December.The IAG transaction is pending approval under EU competition laws. If passed, it will include up to 15 A320 aircraft and include slots at airports like Vienna, Zurich and Munich. IAG says the new company will employ approximately 740 former Niki staff. Posted by Tuesday, January 16, 2018 << Previous PostNext Post >> Travelweek Group IAG confirms plans to acquire struggling Niki read more

Norwia will exhibit at IBC on stand 9C19

first_imgNorwia will exhibit at IBC on stand 9.C19 Broadcast media equipment manufacturer Norwia will demonstrate its miniHUB optical platform at IBC this year.The platform is designed to let broadcasters contribute video and audio over a fully redundant ring structure and the demo will showcases Norwia’s AutoSFP technology.Norwia CEO Tore Steen said that the miniHUB optical platform provides “all the functionality of a multicard system in just one card, striping out cost and reducing the complexity of optical signal distribution.”The platform consists of a fully flexible optical blade with the next generation miniHUB interface and is configurable as a multiple fiber solution or a multiplexed backbone structure that provides redundancy in both main and redundant fiber paths.The miniHUB optical platform is built around a single card that adapts to the individual function a ring structure needs. Norwia’s AutoSFP technology ensures that signal capacity can be easily added without having to worry about bandwidth calculations.“As live content continues to increase in importance, broadcasters need solutions that meet the complex challenges of signal distribution,” said Steen, claiming that Norwia’s miniHUB solution “meets this challenge.”last_img read more

Mediasets controlling shareholder Fininvest has s

first_imgMediaset’s controlling shareholder Fininvest has said it has not received any fresh proposal from Vivendi to break the deadlock between the pair in their long-running dispute over the future of Mediaset’s loss-making pay TV arm, according to multiple reports.Fininvest’s denial followed a spike in Mediaset’s share price on a report by Bloomberg, which said that Vivendi chairman Vincent Bolloré could offer Fininvest shares in the French group to pave the way for a wider deal and ratchet down tension between the pair.Mediaset and Fininvest have responded strongly to Vivendi’s moves before Christmas to acquire a significant stake – 28.8% – in the Italian media group, with Fininvest seeking to shore up its position in order to retain control.The latest twist in the long-running war of words between the pair, which erupted after Vivendi reneged on a deal that would have seen it take 100% control of Mediaset Premium, follows earlier Italian press speculation about the basis for a possible rapprochement.This had been based on an idea floated by analysts at investment bank Natixis, which works closely with Vivendi. The analysts had hypothesised that Vivendi could take full control of Mediaset Premium and Mediaset’s production activities, along with a 49% stake in Mediaset proper, while Fininvest would become the second largest shareholder in Vivendi.Under this scheme, Fininvest would retain majority control of Mediaset’s free TV activities in Italy and Spain, with Vivendi having the option to take majority control in three to five years’ time, possibly in exchange for shares.last_img read more

Disabled peoples organisations DPOs have accuse

first_imgDisabled people’s organisations (DPOs) have accused ministers of attacking freedom of expression and trying to muzzle their critics, after announcing new rules that will ban charities from using government grants to lobby politicians and civil servants.DPOs say that the new rules, announced by the Cabinet Office, will make it even harder to campaign to promote the rights of disabled people.The new rules say that all government grant agreements from 1 May will forbid charities from spending money on work that is intended to influence “parliament, government or political parties”, or “legislative or regulatory action”.But there has been Cabinet Office confusion over whether the new rules would apply to charities responding to government consultations, or trying to improve proposed legislation as it passes through parliament.And the Cabinet Office risked ridicule after it told Disability News Service that government departments would be holding their own consultations on the new rules in the lead-up to their introduction on 1 May.This holds out the prospect of charities being asked to comment on a policy that could prevent them taking part in such consultations in the future.Asked whether this suggested “double standards”, a Cabinet Office spokeswoman said: “I don’t really see a problem at all.”Henrietta Doyle, policy office for Inclusion London, said the new rules showed that the government “dislikes criticism” and was “trying to clamp down on the voluntary sector highlighting the damage their policies are causing”.    She said: “For [Cabinet Office minister] Matthew Hancock to call it ‘the farce of government lobbying government’ shows little understanding that charities provide government with an independent opinion about the impact of their policies on the population.“The proposal inhibits the democratic process. Government policy should be examined by the third sector, which includes disabled people and their organisations.“If a policy is damaging disabled people’s lives then government should be informed of this and voluntary organisations play a vital role in providing this feedback to government and it should not be inhibited in any way, regardless of where the funding comes from.”Tara Flood, director of The Alliance for Inclusive Education (ALLFIE), said the new clause was “appalling”.She said it was already becoming more difficult for campaigning organisations like ALLFIE to secure meetings with government decision-makers, and to find the time and resources to respond to the frequent consultations sent out by government departments, such as the Department for Education.She said: “There is a real resistance, particularly among politicians, to meet with those of us who are going to challenge what politicians say.”Flood said the new clause would also intensify the competition for grants from the few organisations that still fund campaign work, while some charities may just decide to stop campaigning completely.Disability Rights UK said the new clause “fundamentally undermines the value of the third sector in bringing insight and feedback from the people we represent”. Sue Bott, deputy chief executive of Disability Rights UK, said: “It goes against open policy-making and is counter to the ideas of co-production where those affected by a policy have the opportunity to help shape it. “We think this attack on the freedom of expression undermines good policy-making and in the end, far from being good for taxpayers as it is claimed, will do the exact opposite, as poor policy will result.”She said the new clause also contradicts the Compact, the agreement between the government and voluntary organisations across England to ensure that they “work effectively in partnership”. Clause 1.1 of the Compact states that the government will “respect and uphold the independence of civil society organisations to deliver their mission, including their right to campaign, regardless of any relationship, financial or otherwise, which may exist”.Picture: Social care minister Alistair Burt speaking at a meeting organised by the charity-funded Care and Support Alliance at the 2015 Tory party conferencelast_img read more

Uber Stole Trade Secrets Alphabet Subsidiary Alleges

first_img News reporter February 24, 2017 Tom Brant Add to Queue 2 min read –shares Image credit: via PC Mag Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand This story originally appeared on PCMagcenter_img Next Article Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. Waymo, which took over Google’s self-driving car project, says its trade secrets are now in Uber’s hands. Uber Stole Trade Secrets, Alphabet Subsidiary Alleges Uber A former employee stole trade secrets from Google’s self-driving car project and brought them to a startup that was later acquired by Uber, according to a complaint filed in federal court on Thursday.Waymo, a division of Google’s parent company Alphabet that took over the search giant’s self-driving car project last year, filed a complaint against Uber’s subsidiary Otto, claiming trade secret misappropriation, patent infringement and unfair competition.The complaint alleges that Otto co-founder Anthony Levandowski downloaded more than 14,000 proprietary design files — 9.7GB worth of data — for Waymo’s Lidar system in late 2015 before he left the company to found Otto.Those designs showed up in an email that Waymo received from one of its circuit board suppliers in December, according to the complaint. The email, which apparently was referring to Uber’s own Lidar design, confirmed Waymo’s earlier suspicions that Levandowski had given Waymo’s trade secrets to Uber, which acquired Otto in August 2016.”As of August 2016, Uber had no in-house solution for LiDAR — despite 18 months with their faltering Carnegie Mellon University effort — and they acquired Otto to get it,” Waymo wrote in the complaint. “By September 2016, Uber represented to regulatory authorities in Nevada that it was no longer using an off-the-shelf, or third-party, LiDAR technology, but rather using an ‘[i]n-house custom built’ LiDAR system.”Waymo investigated the matter further, and said it discovered that additional former employees — now working at Otto and Uber — also downloaded confidential Lidar information.”Our parent company Alphabet has long worked with Uber in many areas, and we didn’t make this decision lightly,” Waymo said in a statement regarding its lawsuit. “However, given the overwhelming facts that our technology has been stolen, we have no choice but to defend our investment and development of this unique technology.”An Uber spokesperson told PCMag that “we take the allegations made against Otto and Uber employees seriously and we will review this matter carefully.” Enroll Now for $5last_img read more

New project will develop biomarkerbased system to send personalized advice on dietary

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 29 2019The PREVENTOMICS European project will develop, from this November and for 3 years, personalized plans for nutrition and lifestyle habits to improve the health of people, based on individual traits such as physical and behavioral traits, lifestyle, genotype, preferences and physical condition. The personal health plans, which will consider consumers’ needs and requirements, will reach the recipients in the form of behavioral prompts, thanks to the use of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) tools.PREVENTOMICS (Empowering consumers to PREVENT diet-related diseases through OMICS sciences) could be applicable in the future to the personalization of any type of treatment or health condition and represents a unique service, given that “it can be validated for specific diseases or for well-defined life situations where the combination of genetic, biological, nutritional and psychological factors is relevant”, explains Josep Mª del Bas, director of the Nutrition and Health unit of Eurecat, the technology center coordinating the consortium.It is expected that PREVENTOMICS, which has 19 European partners from 7 different countries, will conclude with the introduction of six new products on the market, both in the application of new technologies to improve health (e-business) and in the form of food products intended for human consumption.To achieve this, the project will adopt a comprehensive approach in exploiting the potential of omics techniques, especially metabolomics, to know the state of metabolic health and will focus on techniques to induce a change in behaviour in people in order to deliver preventive personalized nutrition tools, accessible to everyone, that promote changes in current habits and achieve the improvement of personal health in a sustained and lasting manner.One of the innovations of the project, as explained by the scientific coordinator of the biotechnology area of Eurecat and technical coordinator of the project, Antoni Caimari, “is that it is based on a unique integration of genetic, metabolic, nutritional and psychological data”, with the application of computational modelling techniques of the metabolism, which will enable the evaluation and characterization of the most relevant physiological processes—the sustained lack of control of which can lead to the onset of different diseases, and enable the modulation of these deviations to prevent their development”.At the social level, the research carried out by PREVENTOMICS will help to sustain new healthy lifestyle habits, increase user satisfaction and confidence in a more personalized diet and promote greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet as a healthy dietary pattern in line with the recommendations of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA).Related StoriesScientists discover rare autoimmune disease triggered by testicular cancerDiet and nutrition influence microbiome in colonic mucosaResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromeThe project involves innovations at the research level, in interoperability and use of open source data to feed future research; at the social level, in the search for sustainable solutions with more precise information; in terms of health, by harnessing the capabilities of Information and Communications Technology to manage data from different sources; and finally, at the business level, offering more personalized services in line with the growing demand from society.To demonstrate the potential for personalization at different levels of the food value chain, PREVENTOMICS will be validated in three different scenarios using three different companies carrying out intervention studies with both healthy volunteers and volunteers with abdominal obesity who are at moderate risk of suffering from cardiovascular disease.Evolution of personalized nutrition In recent years, “the expectations around personalized nutrition have grown, but there haven’t been sufficiently precise tools nor sufficient understanding of which individual variables are affected or what the behavioral barriers are that prevent the individual from acquiring healthier habits”, explains Caimari.It is estimated that the personalized nutrition market will grow from 81 billion euros in 2015 to 110.5 billion euros in 2020, due to the increase in key trends in society, such as the growing concern for health, a better understanding of the physical condition, the ageing of the population, the increase in disposable income, changes in lifestyle and growth in emerging markets.In this regard, experts agree that the food industry should provide solutions at the individual level, in fields such as nutraceutical and health, sports nutrition, food services or mHealth.Aside from Eurecat, the following is a list of the 19 partners of PREVENTOMICS: ALDI, Alimentòmica, Onmi; Simple Feast; METEDA; Carinsa and Practio; and the research centres and universities Università di Parma, University ofa Southampton, Institute of Communication and Computer Systems, Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam, Leitat, Wageningen University, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski in Krakow and Universiteit Maastricht, as well as the osteoarthritis patients association Osteoarthritis Foundation International (OAFI), the Spanish Consumer Organization (OCU) and the Spanish Association for Standardization (UNE). Source:https://eurecat.org/en/last_img read more

Heat from nanoparticles zaps cancer cells from inside

first_imgGraphic depiction of the process of using cobalt- and manganese-doped nanoparticles to kill tumors via magnetic hyperthermia. Image Credit: Tetiana Korzun By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDJun 26 2019Oregon State University researchers have come up with nanoclusters that are capable of reaching within tumours that are difficult to reach. The results of this breakthrough in cancer therapeutics were published in a study in the latest issue of the journal ACS Nano. The study is titled, “Biocompatible Nanoclusters with High Heating Efficiency for Systemically Delivered Magnetic Hyperthermia.” These nanoclusters are magnetic and are of the size of a billionth of a metre, explain the researchers. They can be easily injected into the body into the cancerous growth and can reach the insides of the tumours easily, they add. Once the nanoclusters have been injected into the tumour, they are subjected to an alternate magnetic field (AMF) from outside, write the researchers. This raises the temperature of the clusters to over 100 degrees Fahrenheit and the heat kills the cancer cells from inside.The team of researchers explain that the hurdle they faced until now was to find the right nanoparticles that could be able to be injected both directly into the tumour as well as via the intravenous route. Both ways they should be able to reach the tumour mass. Once they accumulate within the tumours, the AMF could be used to kill the cancer cells from within. For ovarian cancers and prostate cancer, these nanoparticles have been used intravenously, they write. The team of researchers included OSU electrical engineering professor Pallavi Dhagat, who led the efforts in developing the naoclusters.Lead authors Olena Taratula and Oleh Taratula of the OSU College of Pharmacy along with their colleagues developed nanoclusters. These clusters are multiple nanoparticles that have a better heating efficiency. Each of the hexagon-shaped iron oxide nanoparticles are coated with cobalt and manganese and are carried into the body using “biocompatible PEG–PCL (poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone))-based nanocarriers”, the authors explained.Taratula, associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences in a statement said, “There had been many attempts to develop nanoparticles that could be administered systemically in safe doses and still allow for hot enough temperatures inside the tumor. Our new nanoplatform is a milestone for treating difficult-to-access tumors with magnetic hyperthermia. This is a proof of concept, and the nanoclusters could potentially be optimized for even greater heating efficiency.” She said that this process of magnetic hyperthermia could now be used for cancer treatment. She said, “It’s already been shown that magnetic hyperthermia at moderate temperatures increases the susceptibility of cancer cells to chemotherapy, radiation and immunotherapy.”Related StoriesTiny magnetic microrobots could help drug-delivery nanoparticles reach their targetsEvaluating safety and efficacy of magnetically labeled mesenchymal stem cellsAn injection of nanoparticles for spinal cord injuriesFor the study the team used mouse models in the labs to show that after the animals had been given IV nanocluster injections, they could be treated with magnetic hyperthermia. In the test animals, ovarian cancer was implanted under the skin for the experiment. Taratula explained, “To advance this technology, future studies need to use orthotopic animal models – models where deep-seated tumors are studied in the location they would actually occur in the body. In addition, to minimize the heating of healthy tissue, current AMF systems need to be optimized, or new ones developed.”The authors of the study wrote in conclusion, “this nanoplatform is a milestone in the development of systemically delivered magnetic hyperthermia for the treatment of cancer tumors that are difficult to access for intratumoral injection.”The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health, the OSU College of Pharmacy and Najran University of Saudi Arabia.Related researchAuthors Angl Apostolova from the University of Architecture, Civil Engineering and Geodesy in Sofia, Bulgaria and colleagues this year (April 2019) published their work on magnetic hyperthermia using nanoclusters. Their study was published in the The European Physical Journal B. The study was titled, “Specific absorption rate in Zn-doted ferrites for self-controlled magnetic hyperthermia.”This study showed that the absorption rate of the heat produced by the nanoclusters depends on the composition of the magnetic material as well as its diameter. The team explained that AMF would be used to activate their magnetic particles. Further they assure that these nanoparticles would be absorbed only by the tumour tissues and not by the healthy tissues. To ensure this the team used iron oxide nanoparticles called ferrite, to which they added small amounts of copper, nickel, manganese or cobalt atoms. This is called dopping.They tested the efficacy of the nanoparticles then on mice as well as cell cultures and found that diameter of the particles as well as its composition affected the efficiency of the particles to generate magnetic hyperthermia. They explain that For cobalt dopping the maximum absorption is seen with maximum of 14 nanometres size and for copper dopping maximum absorption is seen with maximum of 16 nanometres size. Journal references: Biocompatible Nanoclusters with High Heating Efficiency for Systemically Delivered Magnetic Hyperthermia, Hassan A. Albarqi, Leon H. Wong, Canan Schumann, Fahad Y. Sabei, Tetiana Korzun, Xiaoning Li, Mikkel N. Hansen, Pallavi Dhagat, Abraham S. Moses, Olena Taratula, and Oleh Taratula, ACS Nano 2019 13 (6), 6383-6395, DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.8b06542 – https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsnano.8b06542 Specific absorption rate in Zn-doted ferrites for self-controlled magnetic hyperthermia, Apostolov, A., Apostolova, I. & Wesselinowa, J. Eur. Phys. J. B (2019) 92: 58. https://doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2019-90567-2last_img read more

New rural development ministry office to come upNew rural development ministry office

first_img The Union government has decided to make a new headquarters for the Ministry of Rural Development here, which will also house offices of other related departments and organisations. The move aims to have a single operations centre for planning and implementation of rural development schemes. The Central Public Works Department (CPWD) was assigned the responsibility to build the ministry’s head office –‘Grameen Vikas Bhavan’– at the Kasturba Gandhi Marg in New Delhi. A ‘green building’ with proper arrangements for water and energy conservation, the building will not only generate 250 kilowatt of solar power, but also reuse 200 kilolitres of water everyday for gardening and cleaning purpose. The building will also have other facilities such as a Central Government Health Scheme (CGHS) dispensary, bank, post office and a creche for the employees’ children. A senior official from the Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs said after completion of the planning work, all necessary approvals for the construction had been taken and the CPWD would begin the project in July. The construction of the building will be completed by July 2021 with an estimated cost of Rs 450 crore. There will be a cafeteria offering regional cuisines in the basement. Currently the ‘Krishi Bhavan’, the headquarters of the Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers’ Welfare, houses the offices of Ministries of Rural Development, Panchayati Raj, Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution, along with offices of other departments of the Centre. The CPWD recently completed work on the headquarters of Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change and before that it made ‘Jawahar Bhavan’ for the Ministry of External Affairs. The building will also have offices for ministers and officials to fast-track formulation and implementation of rural development schemes. To be built following international standards on an area of around 14 thousand square metres, the building will also have meeting rooms and a grand auditorium for conferences. The walls of the nine-storey building will display the rich cultural heritage and daily life in villages. SHARE COMMENT Published on June 16, 2019 SHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENTSlast_img read more