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first_img 0 Comments   Share   “When he’s ready to go, he’s ready to go because there’s nobody quite like him. Even if he’s 90 percent,” head coach Bruce Arians said this week. “The energy he brings and just the respect that he brings (means) you want him on the field.”Campbell has not seen the field on game day since getting chop-blocked by Broncos tight end Julius Thomas on Oct. 5 in Denver.Campbell practiced Thursday and Friday, albeit limited, and the 6-foot-8, 300-pound lineman will be wearing a brace on the knee.“It’s different,” he said. “I’ve never played with a brace on my knee before, so I’ve just got to get used to it. But I felt explosive (in practice) and I was able to play football the way I like to play football.”Meanwhile, running back Marion Grice, a former Arizona State Sun Devil, will be in uniform, active for the first time since he was signed off the San Diego Chargers’ practice squad on Sept. 23.The Cardinals’ seven inactives Sunday are defensive tackle Bruce Gaston, tight end Troy Niklas, nose tackle Alameda Ta’amu, quarterback Logan Thomas, guard Earl Watford and linebackers Glenn Carson and Thomas Keiser. Niklas was ruled out Friday after not practicing all week because of a bad ankle, an injury he suffered at Denver. The other six players are healthy scratches.Both Arians and Campbell said there will be no snap count limitation despite the defensive end’s layoff.“The big thing is just giving everything I have and being honest with the training staff and my coaches and myself — and just making sure that I’m doing what’s best to help the team. That’s it,” Campbell said. “This is a game I want to be a part of. It’s a huge game. The Eagles are a great team. This is a game that’s really going to matter at the end of the year.” Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires GLENDALE, Ariz. — Well, this is different.For much of the season, the Arizona Cardinals have gotten in the habit — a bad habit — of playing without a key player defensively due to injury.This week, the script has been flipped.After missing each of the past two weeks because of a sprained MCL in his right knee, defensive end Calais Campbell will make his return Sunday afternoon when the Cardinals host the Philadelphia Eagles Sunday at University of Phoenix Stadium. The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelocenter_img Top Stories Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact ErrorOKFree Rate QuoteCall now 623-889-0130 ErrorOKlast_img read more

Middleware provider Oregan Networks is to add remo

first_imgMiddleware provider Oregan Networks is to add remote recording and viewing capability to its hybrid digital TV platform.According to Oregan, new multiscreen EPG and PVR applications, running on Android and Apple OS companion devices, will enable consumers to synchronise their tablets, laptops and smart phones with the living room TV, access aggregated search, synchronise recorded libraries and remotely manage scheduling options, including reminders and social alerts features.last_img

Norwia will exhibit at IBC on stand 9C19

first_imgNorwia will exhibit at IBC on stand 9.C19 Broadcast media equipment manufacturer Norwia will demonstrate its miniHUB optical platform at IBC this year.The platform is designed to let broadcasters contribute video and audio over a fully redundant ring structure and the demo will showcases Norwia’s AutoSFP technology.Norwia CEO Tore Steen said that the miniHUB optical platform provides “all the functionality of a multicard system in just one card, striping out cost and reducing the complexity of optical signal distribution.”The platform consists of a fully flexible optical blade with the next generation miniHUB interface and is configurable as a multiple fiber solution or a multiplexed backbone structure that provides redundancy in both main and redundant fiber paths.The miniHUB optical platform is built around a single card that adapts to the individual function a ring structure needs. Norwia’s AutoSFP technology ensures that signal capacity can be easily added without having to worry about bandwidth calculations.“As live content continues to increase in importance, broadcasters need solutions that meet the complex challenges of signal distribution,” said Steen, claiming that Norwia’s miniHUB solution “meets this challenge.”last_img read more

Uber Stole Trade Secrets Alphabet Subsidiary Alleges

first_img News reporter February 24, 2017 Tom Brant Add to Queue 2 min read –shares Image credit: via PC Mag Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand This story originally appeared on PCMagcenter_img Next Article Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. Waymo, which took over Google’s self-driving car project, says its trade secrets are now in Uber’s hands. Uber Stole Trade Secrets, Alphabet Subsidiary Alleges Uber A former employee stole trade secrets from Google’s self-driving car project and brought them to a startup that was later acquired by Uber, according to a complaint filed in federal court on Thursday.Waymo, a division of Google’s parent company Alphabet that took over the search giant’s self-driving car project last year, filed a complaint against Uber’s subsidiary Otto, claiming trade secret misappropriation, patent infringement and unfair competition.The complaint alleges that Otto co-founder Anthony Levandowski downloaded more than 14,000 proprietary design files — 9.7GB worth of data — for Waymo’s Lidar system in late 2015 before he left the company to found Otto.Those designs showed up in an email that Waymo received from one of its circuit board suppliers in December, according to the complaint. The email, which apparently was referring to Uber’s own Lidar design, confirmed Waymo’s earlier suspicions that Levandowski had given Waymo’s trade secrets to Uber, which acquired Otto in August 2016.”As of August 2016, Uber had no in-house solution for LiDAR — despite 18 months with their faltering Carnegie Mellon University effort — and they acquired Otto to get it,” Waymo wrote in the complaint. “By September 2016, Uber represented to regulatory authorities in Nevada that it was no longer using an off-the-shelf, or third-party, LiDAR technology, but rather using an ‘[i]n-house custom built’ LiDAR system.”Waymo investigated the matter further, and said it discovered that additional former employees — now working at Otto and Uber — also downloaded confidential Lidar information.”Our parent company Alphabet has long worked with Uber in many areas, and we didn’t make this decision lightly,” Waymo said in a statement regarding its lawsuit. “However, given the overwhelming facts that our technology has been stolen, we have no choice but to defend our investment and development of this unique technology.”An Uber spokesperson told PCMag that “we take the allegations made against Otto and Uber employees seriously and we will review this matter carefully.” Enroll Now for $5last_img read more

UK guidelines for tests drastically differ from those in the US reports

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 8 2019Dr. Sunita Sah practiced general medicine for several years in the United Kingdom’s National Health Service. When she came to the United States, she noticed something strange.The U.K. guidelines for tests such as mammograms and colon cancer screenings drastically differed from those in the U.S. – even though they were based on the same medical evidence.”Having colonoscopy at the age of 50 – that struck me as rather odd when I moved to the U.S., because you don’t really hear about people having colonoscopies as a screening procedure in the U.K.,” said Sah. “It’s much less invasive to test for blood in the stool. It’s also less costly and doesn’t have the risks of undertaking a colonoscopy.”Now an assistant professor of management and organizations at Cornell, Sah and Ismail Jatoi of the University of Texas Health, San Antonio, say the treatment guidelines recommended by medical specialist organizations are more likely to call for greater use of health care services and exacerbate overdiagnosis, overtreatment and spiraling health care costs. Their commentary, “Clinical Practice Guidelines and the Overuse of Health Care Services: Need for Reform,” appeared March 18 in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.The implications are significant, she said, because guidelines are supposed to provide standard evidence-based treatment practices for all doctors.”The recommendations put out by specialty organizations – like the American College of Cardiology or the American College of Radiology – show specialty bias in recommending more aggressive and/or more frequent screening procedures,” said Sah, an expert on conflict of interest. “In the U.S. in particular, where the fee-for-service compensation model dominates medicine, which is different from countries like the U.K., you see even more recommendations for greater use of health care services.”Specialty bias refers to the tendency of physicians to recommend the treatments in which they are trained to deliver. For example, localized prostate cancer can be treated with either surgery or radiation.”If you go to a surgeon, chances are that they are more likely to recommend that you have surgery; if you go to a radiation oncologist, they are more likely to recommend that you have radiation,” she said. “They each often believe that the treatment that they’re trained in is the better one.”Related StoriesCancer killing capability of lesser-known immune cells identifiedStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsIn the case of screening for colorectal cancer, the American College of Gastroenterology’s panel – all of whom were gastroenterologists – recommended colonoscopy as the best strategy.But the United States Preventive Task Force, with no gastroenterologists or gastrointestinal surgeons, recommended testing the stool, sigmoidoscopy (an exam of only the lower part of the colon) or colonoscopy as a last resort. Stool testing was also recommended by the European Society of Medical Oncology panel, which consisted of six medical oncologists, no gastroenterologists and one gastrointestinal surgeon. The panel said there was limited evidence that screening colonoscopy is effective.”Colonoscopies are more invasive than stool testing and come with potentially greater risks and costs for patients – but increased clinical volume and profits for gastroenterologists,” Sah said.Specialty guidelines are also subject to fee-for-service bias, according to the commentary. Doctors who receive a payment for each treatment may tend to recommend that treatment more often, because they have a financial interest in it.”The bias is not necessarily malicious or intentional,” Sah said. “In a fee-for-service environment, they may be biased to do more rather than less, so it becomes a habit.”But more is not necessarily better, she said. “Sometimes the risks of those procedures are just not worth the benefits.”The authors call for a reduction in conflicts of interest in the fee-for-service model, and more professional diversity in the makeup of the guideline committees. “You need a variety of different voices on those committees,” Sah said.And patients could ask their doctors which guidelines they follow and why. “Ask them questions,” she said. “Ask your doctor to explain their thought process in recommending the particular guideline and the advantages or disadvantages of one guideline versus another.”Cornell University has dedicated television and audio studios available for media interviews supporting full HD, ISDN and web-based platforms. Source:http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2019/03/sah-medical-guidelines-may-be-biased-overly-aggressivelast_img read more

New clinical trial to compare effectiveness of injectable drugs and oral medications

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)May 10 2019Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, working with the National Institutes of Health, will conduct a clinical trial beginning this month to determine if monthly injections of anti-viral drugs are more effective at suppressing the HIV virus than daily pills in a population for whom daily adherence has been a challenge.Over the years, HIV has moved from a nearly uniformly fatal disease to a chronic one that can be managed with medication. But many patients still face obstacles to taking the daily medications which keep the virus dormant, leading to a potentially dangerous flare up.Related StoriesPrevalence of anal cancer precursors is higher in women living with HIV than previously reportedPatients with HIV DNA in cerebrospinal fluid have high risk of experiencing cognitive deficitsReprogramming cells to control HIV infection”When they are taking their pills, the virus becomes undetectable,” said Jose Castillo-Mancilla, MD, associate professor of medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “But you need to take your pills. And sometimes taking pills is hard due to life circumstances.”The trial is called Long-Acting Therapy to Improve Treatment Success in Daily Life or LATITUDE. It will examine whether two experimental injectable drug formulations of antiretroviral therapy (ART) are more effective than daily pills.Castillo-Mancilla, an infectious disease expert, is co-chair of LATITUDE. He said the injectables could keep steady drug concentrations in the blood, unlike oral medications if doses are missed.The injectable drugs, rilpivirine (RPV) and cabotegravir (CAB), will be given every four weeks. Investigators will measure the virus in the blood throughout the study and compare it with those taking pills.Approximately 350 volunteers with documented treatment lapses within the last 18 months will be enrolled in the trial for 52 weeks.Currently, there are about 1.1 million people with HIV in the U.S. That number is approximately 40 million worldwide.”It is not a curable epidemic but it is a controllable one,” Castillo-Mancilla said. “We believe we can get to zero transmission. The generous volunteers who enroll in this study will help ensure that more people living with HIV may have more effective treatment regimens that work for them.” Source:https://www.cuanschutz.edu/last_img read more

Chile tests floating solar panels to power mine save water

first_imgLos Bronces is about 3,500 meters (11,500 feet) above sea level and is 65 kilometers (40 miles) from the country’s capital, Santiago. In 2018, the mine produced 370,000 tons of fine copper and 2,421 tons of molybdenum.Almost 20 percent of the energy currently produced and used in Chile comes from renewable sources, up from 6 percent in 2013. A worker on a boat approaches a floating island of solar panels at Los Bronces mine, about 65 kilometers (approximately 40 miles) from Santiago, Chile, Thursday, March 14, 2019. Los Bronces is about 3,500 meters (11,500 feet) above sea level. In 2018, the mine produced 370,000 tons of fine copper and 2,421 tons of molybdenum. (AP Photo / Esteban Felix) The experimental “Las Tortolas” power-generating island is being run by the giant Anglo American mining company at its Los Bronces mine, and the initiative comes as the government pushes to put Chile at the forefront of renewable energy use in Latin America and the world.The 1,200-square-foot array of solar panels was inaugurated Thursday by Chilean Mining Minister Baldo Prokurica. Officials said that if the test is successful, the $250,000 plant could be expanded to cover 40 hectares, or nearly 100 acres.The array floats in the middle of a pond that is used to contain the refuse from mining, known as tailings, and it is expected that its shadow will lower the water temperature and reduce evaporation by 80 percent. Thus, the mine would retain more of that water for its operations and could reduce the amount of fresh water it pumps in the dry mountainous region where water is a scarce commodity.”With this system, we can make our fresh water consumption more efficient, in line with our goal of re-imagining mining and reducing Anglo American’s fresh water consumption by 50 percent by 2030, as well as the CO2 emissions by producing non-polluting energy,” said Patricio Chacana, Los Bronces’ vice president of operations. Workers stand on a floating island of solar panels on a pond at Los Bronces mine, about 65 kilometers (approximately 40 miles) from Santiago, Chile, Thursday, March 14, 2019. The 1,200-square-foot array of solar panels was inaugurated Thursday by Chilean Mining Minister Baldo Prokurica. Officials said that if the test is successful, the $250,000 plant could be expanded to cover 40 hectares, or nearly 100 acres. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix) © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. A floating island of solar panels is being tested in Chile as a way to generate clean energy and reduce water loss at mine operations, a cornerstone of the Andean country’s economy that uses huge amounts of electricity and water. Ten towns hit by river pollution from Brazil dam disaster If the yearlong experiment works as planned, the solar panel island could be expanded and new ones could be installed at other mining ponds. Experts say there are approximately 800 such ponds in Chile.”It is an excellent idea for the traceability of the mining industry and especially in terms of more efficient use of water. This is a company that recycles 76 percent of the water it uses in its processes,” the mining minister said at the unveiling and he encouraged other mining companies to follow suit.In addition, Prokurica said the Mining Ministry is working on a plan to improve the safety of the mine holding ponds, to guard against failures such as one at an iron ore mine recently in Brazil that unleashed a wall of mud that killed at least 186 people and polluted hundreds of miles of river. Many of the tailing ponds in the north of the country are near urban centers. A worker stands on a floating island of solar panels at Los Bronces mine, about 65 kilometers (approximately 40 miles) from Santiago, Chile, Thursday, March 14, 2019. If the yearlong experiment works as planned, the solar panel island could be expanded and new ones could be installed at other mining ponds. Experts say there are approximately 800 such ponds in Chile. (AP Photo / Esteban Felix)center_img Explore further A worker stands on a floating island of solar panels at Los Bronces mine, about 65 kilometers (approximately 40 miles) from Santiago, Chile, Thursday, March 14, 2019. If the yearlong experiment works as planned, the solar panel island could be expanded and new ones could be installed at other mining ponds. Experts say there are approximately 800 such ponds in Chile. (AP Photo / Esteban Felix) An island of solar panels floats in a pond at the Los Bronces mining plant, about 65 kilometers (approximately 40 miles) from Santiago, Chile, Thursday, March 14, 2019. The array floats in the middle of a pond that is used to contain the refuse from mining, known as tailings, and it is expected that the island’s shadow will lower the water temperature and reduce evaporation by 80 percent. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix) This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Chile tests floating solar panels to power mine, save water (2019, March 15) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-chile-solar-panels-power.html An island of solar panels floats in a pond at the Los Bronces mining plant, about 65 kilometers (approximately 40 miles) from Santiago, Chile, Thursday, March 14, 2019. The island of solar panels could give purpose to mine refuse in Chile by using them to generate clean energy and reduce water evaporation.(AP Photo / Esteban Felix) An island of solar panels floats in a pond at the Los Bronces mining plant, about 65 kilometers (approximately 40 miles) from Santiago, Chile, Thursday, March 14, 2019. The array floats in the middle of a pond that is used to contain the refuse from mining, known as tailings, and it is expected that the island’s shadow will lower the water temperature and reduce evaporation by 80 percent. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)last_img read more

Modi to open Odisha airport fertiliser plantModi to open Odisha airport fertiliser

first_imgOrissa Published on COMMENTS SHARE SHARE EMAIL Press Trust of India Prime Minister Narendra Modi is slated to launch a slew of projects including a fertiliser plant at Talcher and inauguration of Jharsuguda Airport in Odisha on Saturday, officials said on Thursday. During his one-day visit to the State, Modi will also dedicate to the nation mines of the NTPC and the Mahanadi Coalfields Ltd (MCL) and railway tracks for transportation of coal. Garjanbahal open cast mine of the MCL, to be inaugurated by Modi, has coal block reserve of 230 million tonnes with annual production capacity of 13 million tonnes. It will generate direct employment for 894 people and indirect job opportunities for 5,000, officials said. New rail lineThe Prime Minister will also launch the 53-km-long Jharsuguda-Serdega railway line constructed by MCL. This line can also be used for passenger traffic.Modi will dedicate to the nation Dulanga Coal Mining Project of the NTPC in Sundargarh district. This is the second mine of the NTPC to be operational and its first in Odisha.center_img September 20, 2018 SHARE COMMENTlast_img read more

TRS leader kidnapped by Maoists 3 days ago found dead in Chhattisgarh

first_img India Today Web Desk New DelhiJuly 12, 2019UPDATED: July 12, 2019 19:40 IST Telangana Rashtra Samithi (TRS) leader Nalluri Srinivas Rao was kidnapped on Monday. (Photo: ANI)Telangana Rashtra Samithi (TRS) leader Nalluri Srinivas Rao who was kidnapped by the Maoists was found dead on Friday. The body of the TRS leader was found in Puttapadu village of Sukma District in Chhattisgarh. Nalluri Srinivas Rao was kidnapped on Monday.According to the reports, 45-year-old Nalluri Srinivas Rao was abducted from Kothur village in Bhadradri-Kothagudem district in Telangana around midnight.The cause of the TRS leader’s death is yet to be ascertained by the police.”His body was found in Errampadu, a small hamlet in Chhattisgarh. There was an injury on his head. We have to ascertain how he died. Only after an inquest can we exactly say how he died and whether it is a bullet injury or head injury,” Rajesh Chandra, Additional Superintendent of Police Bhadrachalam, said.He said a team was on its way to the neighbouring state to complete the formalities and bring the body back.Rao’s wife, Durga, had earlier told news channels that around 10-15 unidentified people, some of them carrying weapons and sticks, had dragged her husband out of their house even as she and her son pleaded with them.She said they beat up all of them. “When we tried to stop them, they also pointed a gun at me. We were not allowed to step out of our house,” PTI quoted Durga as saying.Also Read | Samajwadi Party leader shot dead in Greater NoidaAlso Read | Shivpal Yadav-led Pragatisheel Samajwadi Party leader found dead in AmethiAlso Watch | Smriti Irani lends shoulder to mortal remains of close aide who was shot dead in AmethiFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byChanchal Chauhan TRS leader kidnapped by Maoists 3 days ago found dead in ChhattisgarhThe body of the TRS leader was found in Puttapadu village of Sukma District in Chhattisgarh. Nalluri Srinivas Rao was kidnapped on Monday.advertisement Nextlast_img read more