Man credits square dancing with helping manage kidney disease

first_imgElmer and Betty Toops danced their first square dance in 1980. In the 32 years that have followed, nothing’s stopped their dancing.Their two children, now adults, took dance lessons. Weekends concluded with Sunday evening dances. Family vacations included square-dance festivals.You can do-si-do your way to better health at these upcoming events:o Round-dancing lessons with Dorothy Lowder: 3-6 p.m. every Sunday at Clark County Square Dance Center, 10713 N.E. 117th Ave., Vancouver. First lesson free; $5 per lesson after. 503-232-7544.o Country line-dance lessons, 6:30- 8 p.m. every Tuesday at Fishers Grange No. 211, 814 N.E. 162nd Ave., Vancouver. Admission is $4. 360-521-8360.o Square dance with the Buzzin’ Bees, 7:30 p.m. Sept. 1 at Hazel Dell Grange No. 1124, 7509 N.E. Hazel Dell Ave., Vancouver. Admission is $6. 360-833-0879.o Sunday dances, 2-4 p.m. every Sunday at Luepke Senior Center, 1009 E. McLoughlin Blvd., Vancouver. Admission is $3. 360-487-7055.Not even Elmer’s end-stage renal disease diagnosis two years ago has been able to stop the dancing duo. In fact, Betty believes the dancing is what keeps Elmer healthy after nearly four decades with a disease that has slowly destroyed his kidneys.“That’s what keeps him going,” she said. “I truly believe it was the square dancing and the physical exercise. That’s why his kidney function went as long as it did.”Elmer was 35 years old when routine blood work revealed he had Berger’s disease.Berger’s disease develops when an antibody lodges in the kidneys, hampering their ability to filter waste, water and electrolytes from the blood. Over time, it can lead to blood and protein in one’s urine, high blood pressure, and swollen hands and feet, according to the Mayo Clinic.last_img

Leave a Comment