first_imgThe play in question:🤷‍♂️pic.twitter.com/tiYIK4AeBw— Sporting News (@sportingnews) December 29, 2019The reversal, of course, spurred some creative discussion on Twitter. Some of the more interesting tweets from the controversial call:Warning: Foul language used.So the NFL doesn’t have a monopoly on awful calls and terrible excuse making…3 steps w a football secured is a football move…— Michael Wilbon (@RealMikeWilbon) December 29, 2019“What constitutes a football move?”Refs:pic.twitter.com/BAkJccvGys— Barstool Sports (@barstoolsports) December 29, 2019He didn’t make a “football move” because the defender was preventing him by … forcing a fumble. Looked like a catch but what do I know.— Seth Davis (@SethDavisHoops) December 29, 2019He had 4 feet down. How can that not be a catch?— Brian Snow (@BSnow247) December 29, 2019Well we all learned that 4 steps isn’t a football move..Now I understand why punters and kickers aren’t considered football players. Makes so much more sense now.— Pat McAfee (@PatMcAfeeShow) December 29, 2019This was a catch, a football move, a strip, a fumble, a defensive touchdown, and a bullshit reversal by the refs.pic.twitter.com/PlS35wxf68— JERRY DUNLEAVY (@JerryDunleavy) December 29, 2019The guy who just scored a TD for Ohio State took fewer steps after the catch than the Clemson WR who “didn’t fumble.”— Jeff Drummond (@JDrumUK) December 29, 2019I really don’t care who wins this game but that was a catch and fumble no matter what you say #CFBPlayoff— Cameron Magruder (@ScooterMagruder) December 29, 2019That’s a catch. That’s a catch. That’s a catch. Telling you right now that receiver knows he caught that and fumbled.— Anthony Gonzalez (@anthonygonzalez) December 29, 2019 A question that has plagued the NFL in recent seasons made its way to the College Football Playoff on Saturday: What is a football move?Alternatively: What is a catch? The play that forced said question occurred in the third quarter of the Fiesta Bowl matchup between Ohio State and Clemson. Tigers receiver Justyn Ross seemed to catch a pass from Trevor Lawrence and take several steps, ball in hand, before cornerback Jeff Okudah knocked it loose for a fumble. Safety Jordan Fuller recovered the fumble and returned it for a go-ahead touchdown.MORE: Ohio State-Clemson updates, scores, highlightsBut SEC officials calling the game reviewed the play and overturned the call on the field, immediately triggering what will be the talking point from this game, especially after Clemson won 29-23. Referee Ken Williamson, speaking after the game, explained that both the in-stadium instant replay and video center determined the ball was loose in Ross’ hands, meaning he didn’t complete the process of a catch.last_img

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