Assam finish at 7th place with 76 medals in 3rd Khelo India Games

first_imgOur Sports ReporterGUWAHATI: Assam finished at 7th place with 76 medals in the 3rd Khelo India Games which concluded in the city today. It was the best-ever performance by Assam in the history of the Games. On the last day, Assam collected 12 medals including a gold, to take their final tally to 76 which included 20 gold, 22 silver, and 34 bronze medals. The lone gold medal came in the boxing which was collected by Ankushita Boro in the girl’s U-21 category. Anubhuti Barua and Priyanka Barua collected silver medals in the swimming and boxing disciplines respectively while the U-21 boy’s football team finished second losing to Punjab in the final 0-2. Among the 8 bronze medals, one came in swimming (Reinita Gogoi in 200mt breaststroke in U-21 girls) and remaining all in boxing.Utilizing home conditions, Assam came out with flying colors in the Games this time. There were 20 disciplines in the third edition of the Games and Assam bagged medals in 12 of them. Lawn bowl, swimming, weightlifting and boxing are the disciplines where the home State dominated and collected most of the medals. In terms of overall best performance, lawn bowl will rank one with 10 medals including seven gold. There were ten medal events in lawn bowl and the host team won medals in all categories.Swimming came in second spot with 14 medals which included five gold, three silver and six bronze. Weightlifting at third spot with 8 medals (3 are gold). On the other hand, in boxing, the State collected 19 medals with a single gold.In individual performance, Shivangi Sarma was the star among the all participating athletes. The Assam swimmer bagged seven medals from the pool and five of them are gold.Also Read: Assam’s Ankushita Bora clinches gold for Assam in boxing at Khelo India Games in GuwahatiAlso Watch: Minister of State for Education Smt. Vibhavariben Dave addresses Academia in Guwahati.last_img read more

BH Team of the Year: Women’s Hockey

first_imgWisconsin’s women’s hockey team was one of the most dominant teams not only on campus, but in the nation, this year. The powerhouse Badgers won their fourth national championship in six years.[/media-credit]Four national titles in six years.While Wisconsin upended No. 1 Ohio State on the football field and the basketball court, its very own No. 1 team brought home yet another national title.Football brought Badger nation back to Pasadena, but unable to bring home a victory its bid for team of the year ultimately fell one game short.In a 41-game season, the women’s hockey team lost only two games and tied two, which were both shootout wins. For the season, the Badgers outscored their opponents 212-70 and attracted more than a total of 52,500 fans to their home games.Without a doubt, the national champions are the team of the year.Led by 2011 Patty Kazmaier award winner (given to the top player in women’s hockey) senior Meghan Duggan, the Badgers quickly became an intimidating force.Beginning the season with an eight-game homestand, UW went 8-0. After losses to conference rivals Minnesota and Minnesota-Duluth each one time in the first half of the season, Wisconsin didn’t lose another game and ended the season on a 27-game unbeaten streak.Before the Badgers even made it into the national championship, they played one of women’s hockey’s most unforgettable games. Drawing a crowd of 10,668 fans to the Kohl Center, Wisconsin faced Minnesota and didn’t disappoint, winning 3-1.The players themselves felt the electricity and knew they had witnessed something special. But that game was only the beginning of their ride to another national title.Facing Minnesota once again in the WCHA tournament title game, the Badgers found themselves down 4-1. The game seemed over before the third period even started. Then, something happened that didn’t stop until the final second ticked away in the national championship game. UW came back and pushed the game into overtime, where senior Kelly Nash notched the winning goal. It was one of the few times this season the Badgers had to fight from behind for a victory.Nash’s game-winning goal is one of the main reasons Wisconsin won another national title and is the team of the year. With names like Duggan, Hilary Knight and Brianna Decker, Wisconsin was already full of talented goal-scorers.It wasn’t these front three who made the Badgers so intimidating – it was a team effort.At the end of the season, 15 Badgers, five of whom were defensemen, had at least two goals apiece.Wisconsin didn’t just bring home its fourth national championship – it dominated the ice as a team every game.last_img read more

Patrick Sandoval’s strong start cut short in Angels’ loss

first_img Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros “It’s not the best way to evaluate him,” Ausmus said of the abbreviated starts, “but let’s be honest. We want to keep him healthy more than evaluate him. We’ll have more time to evaluate him.”Sandoval, who had allowed only one run and was working on his second straight effective outing, said he knew in advance he’d be on a tight pitch count.“I know it’s for my own good,” Sandoval said. “It’s to keep me healthy. I’m on board.”In Sandoval’s first two seasons after he was drafted out of Mission Viejo High, he pitched in short-season leagues. In the next two, he pitched in full-season leagues, but his seasons ended at the beginning of September.Last year Sandoval pitched 122-1/3 innings with the Houston Astros and Angels organizations. This season he has pitched 106 innings, including his minor league work, with perhaps three or four starts left before the end of the season. Ausmus said the Angels want to keep him around the same workload as he had last year. Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros Otherwise, he issued a first-inning walk to Matt Chapman, and that was it. He retired the final five batters he faced, including two of his three strikeouts, before Ausmus pulled him.At the time the Angels trailed just 1-0, but Jake Jewell let the game get away in the fifth.Jewell gave up a homer to catcher Sean Murphy, who was making his major league debut. After allowing a single to Sheldon Neuse, Jewell gave up a two-run homer to Marcus Semien. It was Semien’s 17th career homer against the Angels, including nine in the past two seasons. He has 101 career homers.That was more than the Angels could muster against right-hander Tanner Roark, who weaved out of trouble in the early innings before settling into a groove.In the first inning, the Angels had runners at second and third with two outs and Shohei Ohtani at the plate, but Ohtani struck out. In the third, they loaded the bases with two outs, but Justin Upton grounded out. They wasted Matt Thaiss’ leadoff double in the fourth.After that, Roark retired nine straight hitters, getting the game into the seventh inning with the four-run lead intact. Asked why not just have him pitch deeper into games, but then shut him down before the end of the season, Ausmus said the Angels believe it’s better that he gets acclimated to working all the way to the end of the season.So far the Angels don’t have plans to treat rookie Jose Suarez the same way, Ausmus said. Suarez threw 117 innings last year, and so far this year he’s at 95-1/3.While the Angels try to limit Sandoval’s work toward the end, they are seeing him making progress in his performance.Sandoval had a 6.75 ERA through his first four games. Before his next start, pitching coach Doug White suggested that he move from the third base side of the rubber to the middle. That helped him pitch five scoreless innings against the Texas Rangers on Aug. 28, allowing just one hit and striking out nine.Sandoval explained that the new position helped him feel more confident with his curve and slider, in addition to the fastball and changeup that he’d relied on mostly before.“Absolutely, it’s a huge help,” said Sandoval, who was back on the middle of the rubber on Wednesday night.He gave up just one hit, an opposite-field homer to Jurrickson Profar in the second inning.Related Articles PreviousThe Angels’ Shohei Ohtani shows his frustration after striking out swinging – his third strikeout in as many at-bats – during the eighth inning of Wednesday’s game in Oakland. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani walks back to the dugout after striking out in the top of the sixth inning of Wednesday’s game against the A’s in Oakland. Ohtani went 0 for 3 with three strikeouts. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)Angels starting pitcher Patrick Sandoval throws to the plate during the first inning of Wednesday’s game against the A’s in Oakland. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsOAKLAND, CALIFORNIA – SEPTEMBER 04: Tanner Roark #60 of the Oakland Athletics pitches against the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in the top of the first inning at Ring Central Coliseum on September 04, 2019 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels’ Albert Pujols follows through on a double off Oakland Athletics pitcher Tanner Roark during the first inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Angels starting pitcher Patrick Sandoval throws to the plate during the first inning of Wednesday’s game against the A’s in Oakland. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA – SEPTEMBER 04: Jurickson Profar #23 of the Oakland Athletics trots around the bases after hitting a solo home run off of Patrick Sandoval #43 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in the bottom of the second inning at Ring Central Coliseum on September 04, 2019 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)Oakland Athletics’ Jurickson Profar celebrates after hitting a home run off Los Angeles Angels’ Patrick Sandoval during the second inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels’ Brian Goodwin reacts to a strike thrown by Oakland Athletics’ Tanner Roark during the third inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Oakland Athletics’ Sean Murphy watches his home run off Los Angeles Angels’ Jake Jewell, his first hit in the majors, during the fifth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Oakland Athletics’ Sean Murphy, right, is congratulated by third base coach Matt Williams after hitting a home run off Los Angeles Angels’ Jake Jewell during the fifth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Los Angeles Angels’ Jake Jewell (65) waits for Oakland Athletics’ Marcus Semien, left, to run the bases oh a two-run home run during the fifth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)Oakland Athletics’ Marcus Semien, right, celebrates with Sheldon Neuse (64) after hitting a two-run home run off Los Angeles Angels’ Jake Jewell during the fifth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA – SEPTEMBER 04: Jake Jewell #65 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim pitches against the Oakland Athletics in the bottom of the fifth inning at Ring Central Coliseum on September 04, 2019 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani shows his frustration after striking out swinging – his third strikeout in as many at-bats – during the eighth inning of Wednesday’s game in Oakland. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani walks back to the dugout after striking out in the top of the sixth inning of Wednesday’s game against the A’s in Oakland. Ohtani went 0 for 3 with three strikeouts. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)NextShow Caption1 of 14The Angels’ Shohei Ohtani walks back to the dugout after striking out in the top of the sixth inning of Wednesday’s game against the A’s in Oakland. Ohtani went 0 for 3 with three strikeouts. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)Expand Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone OAKLAND — Although the Angels are going to have Patrick Sandoval walk for the end of his first marathon, they still want him to cross the finish line.Sandoval was pulled after just 3-1/3 innings and 52 pitches in the Angels’ 4-0 loss to the Oakland A’s on Wednesday night, a sign of what is to come over the season’s final four weeks for the 22-year-old rookie.Manager Brad Ausmus explained afterward that the Angels want to reduce Sandoval’s workload enough that he can make it to the end of his first season pitching through September. Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

State prepares rules for launching industrial hemp as a crop in 2020

first_imgThe governor’s signing of the bill that makes industrial hemp production legal has put the process in motion to create the rules for producers. Iowa Agriculture Secretary Mike Naig says the 2018 federal farm bill opened the way, and the state now has to follow through.“We will apply to the U-S-D-A and seek approval from them to have a state program,” Naig explains. “So, there is quite a bit of work yet to do here before we actually have a program to implement here in the state.” He says that means there won’t be any hemp grown on Iowa farms until 2020. That gives producers time to research hemp as a possible crop.“We’re encouraging folks to take the time. We’ve got a year now to look at everything from the agronomic things that you need to look at — from a seed selection and tillage and land and all those types of things — all the way across to what are the markets for the product. Are you growing industrial hemp forfor C-B-D production or for fiber of for grain and oil production.” He says it is the same process you should use for any new crop.“We really encourage folks to take the time and understand and learn and then be ready to take the field in 2020 is that is viable for them,” Naig says.Naig says there could be some crossover in the equipment used for traditional crops and the planting of industrial hemp.“From a seeding standpoint we understand, and I think some the traditional planting equipment probably works,” according to Naig. “And then really on the harvest side, it so much depends on what the end use is.” He says you might need different equipment to harvest the hemp for oil than you do for harvesting it for fiber. Those who pushed for legalizing industrial hemp say it has a variety of uses from fabric to oils, paper and rope that could benefit farmers. Naig says you have to research if growing hemp is viable for your operation.“I’ve said many times I am confident that we can grow industrial hemp in the state of Iowa. We used to and we’re good at growing nearly anything,” Naig says. “It’s really a question in my mind of whether or not folks have a viable market for that product. And that’s really what we should be looking at from an economic standpoint.” Naig says industrial hemp has the potential to be grown anywhere in Iowa.“The legislature did cap the amount of acres that a producer can grow to 40 acres — so we’re not talking about whole sections of farmland here that would be going into farm production,” Naig explains. “Forty-acre tracts or smaller tracts of land — I think we’ve seen that in some other states like Kentucky where they’ve really been ahead here on industrial hemp production. I think it can be applied anywhere — but again — economics will really drive that.” Farmers cannot legally grow hemp in Iowa until the U-S-D-A approves the proposed regulatory plan Naig’s department is working up. The law l does not legalize the recreational use of marijuana, and requires the hemp plants to have T-H-C levels of point three (0.3) percent or less. Plants with T-H-C levels above that percentage are still considered controlled substances in the state and must be destroyed.last_img read more