Security guards charged with $3.2M theft freed

first_imgThe three security guards attached to the Massy Security Limited, who were charged in March for stealing some $3.2 million had the matter dismissed against them by Magistrate Dylan Best on Tuesday.The three security guardsClarence Patterson, 50; Shawn Good luck, 44; and Cosmo Chichester, 48; were jointly charged and denied the allegation. The prosecution contended that on November 13, 2017, at Charlotte and Oronoque Streets, Georgetown, they stole two Republic Bank tamper proof money bags with $1 million cash, along with $2.2 million in cheques; property of Marics and Company Limited.The men were reportedly responsible for collecting daily sales from various businesses and depositing it at the bank. However, the company later discovered that the monies were not deposited and reported the matter to the Police.Magistrate Best in dismissing the matter, told the prosecution that the evidence presented was insufficient to convict the trio, and as such, they were freed of the charge.last_img read more

Cape film boost for economy

first_img20 July 2007The Western Cape’s growing film industry contributed an estimated R3.5-billion to South Africa’s gross domestic product (GDP) in the 2006/07 financial year, according to a study commissioned by the Cape Film Commission.Total turnover for the Western Cape film industry was estimated at R2.65-billion for the year, with about 77% (R2.03-billion) of this located in Cape Town.Barry Standish and Antony Boting from the University of Cape Town’s Graduate School of Business carried out the study earlier this year.The study estimates that 30 long form productions, 600 commercials and 2 100 stills productions were made in the Western Cape in 2006/07.Long form productions, with a turnover of R1.12-billion, was the largest part of the industry, followed by commercials at R0.87-billion and stills at an estimated R0.66-billion. Inside of long form, feature films added R934.3-million and made-for-TV productions R181.3-million.Service commercials made up the largest part of the local commercials industry, with a turnover of R631.8-million in 2006/07, followed by local commercials (R162.5-million) and international commercials (R77.9-million).Creating jobsThe study estimates that the film industry created at least 6 058 full year job equivalents in the Western Cape, of which 1 841 were in long form, 2 459 in commercials and 1 758 in stills. It is estimated that about 4 638 (77%) of these direct jobs were in Cape Town.Estimates are that 2 501 “indirect jobs” were also created in the province through linkages to the film industry, 1 915 of which were in Cape Town.“In total, between 7.9 and 8.2 direct and indirect jobs are created in South Africa for every R1-million spend on production,” the study found.Knock-on effectCatering and accommodation had the most film-related indirect jobs, followed by business services, the general business sector, financial services, and machinery and equipment renting and leasing.The study also found that the film industry is an important contributor to “bed nights” in South Africa, with at least 313 576 bed nights generated throughout the country in 2006/07.Of these, at least 252 000 were generated in the Western Cape, represents 10.7% of the estimated total 2.36-million business bed nights in the province for the year.SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Rail station for Durban’s 2010 stadium

first_imgAccording to Metrorail, millions of rands have already been spent on renovating ticket offices and public toilets, building new paraplegic toilets, painting all buildings, fencing, resurfacing platforms, installing new station signage and upgrading station lighting, and public address systems. Hattingh added that the number of officers working with the South African Police Service’s railway police unit would be increased from 350 to 700 by 2010. “The major improvements to existing stations and the construction of an ultra-modern station near the stadium will be a legacy we want to put in place for our commuters beyond 2010,” Dube said, adding that 20 refurbished 10M5 trains would also be ready for use by then. The first phase of an integrated communications system, costing R25-million, will be installed at five stations, Berea Road, Rossburgh, Reunion, Umlazi and Duffs Road and will include passenger communication equipment, electric notice boards and emergency panic buttons. According to Metrorail, there are also plans to build a shopping mall in the vicinity of the stadium. Public transport legacy Metrorail KwaZulu-Natal has set aside R140-million to build a new train station next to Durban’s Moses Mabhida Stadium, to make it more accessible for soccer fans ahead of the 2010 Fifa World Cup. 27 November 2008center_img He added that in an effort to avoid congestion, park and ride facilities would be provided at several stations, enabling soccer fans to park their cars at the stations and then catch a train to the stadium. Stations which have received a facelift are Thembalihle, Greenwood Park, Briadene, Dalbridge, Congella, Montclair, Lindokuhle and Umlazi, while refurbishment is in progress at Brea, Umngeni, Redhil, Umbilo, Merebank and Malvern. Metrorail KwaZulu-Natal regional manager Dumi Dube explained that the development formed part of the national transport strategy to ensure the safe and comfortable conveyance of fans during the tournament. “We expect the train station to be ready by September 2009, and it will also serve as a safe and convenient crossing point for pedestrians wishing to reach the stadium from Umngeni and Walter Gilbert roads,” Metrorail acting business development manager Danny Hattingh said in Durban this week. Phase 1 Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

New unit to tackle corrupt officials

first_img2 December 2010 The South African government has launched a special unit to tackle corruption in the country’s public service by investigating suspected corrupt officials, improving lines for reporting wrong-doing, and protecting whistleblowers and witnesses. Launching the unit in Johannesburg last week, Public Service and Administration Minister Richard Baloyi said the unit would investigate officials with undisclosed business interests as well as official who did outside work without permission, who solicited bribes, or who received grants or benefits unlawfully. Baloyi said the unit would operate in collaboration with the police Special Investigative Unit, the Auditor-General, the Public Service Commission, and the National Treasury. Provincial anti-corruption units will also work hand-in-hand with the new unit, which is divided into three divisions to handle investigations, legal and disciplinary matters, and strategic information management. It will conduct, facilitate and coordinate the investigation of high-profile cases and, where necessary, refer investigation outcomes to the relevant authorities for further action. It will also oversee disciplinary proceedings in high-profile cases. “Our stance is zero tolerance on corruption,” Baloyi said, adding that rooting out corruption would lead in turn to a more efficient public service. Last month, the Public Service Commission recommended the establishment of an anti-corruption unit in the public service because non-compliance and a lack of coordination was hampering the fight against corruption in government departments. Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Insects to watch for this summer

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest With continued dry weather, spider mites are one of the main pests to remain vigilant about in field crops. They will often show up in field borders first as they move in from other habitats, for example if nearby ditches have been mowed. Spider mites are difficult to see. Look for injury signs — yellow spotting or stippling on the upper side of leaves. In soybean this damage usually begins in the lower canopy and progresses upward as the mite population increases. Heavily infested leaves may also have light webbing similar to spider webs.There are no number-based thresholds available for mites, in part because counting them is not practical in a scouting context. During drought populations can increase rapidly so scouting every four to five days in recommended during drought conditions. Walk a broad pattern in the field and examine at least two plants in each of 20 locations. Use the following scale developed by the University of Minnesota to evaluate spider mite damage in soybean, with treatment recommended at level 3. There are relatively few products available for the treatment of two-spotted spider mites and some pyrethroid insecticides may actually “flare” spider mite populations, making them worse.0. No spider mites of injury observed1. Minor stippling on lower leaves, no premature yellowing observed.2. Stippling common on lower leaves, small areas on scattered plants with yellowing.3. Heavy stippling on lower leaves with some stippling progressing into middle canopy. Mites are present in middle canopy with scattered colonies in upper canopy. Lower leaf yellowing is common and there is some lower leaf loss (spray threshold).4. Lower leaf yellowing readily apparent. Leaf drop common. Stippling, webbing and mites are common in middle canopy with mites and minor stippling present in the upper canopy (economic loss).5. Lower leaf loss common, yellowing or browning moving up plant into middle canopy, stippling and distortion of upper leaves common with mites present in high levels in middle and lower canopy.Common choices for spider mite control in soybeans are products containing chlorpyrifos, dimethoate, bifenthrin though other miticides exist. A product newly available for twospotted spider mite control is Agri-Mek (Syngenta), whose label was recently expanded to include soybean and sweet corn. We have not evaluated the efficacy of this product. Grasshoppers, Japanese beetles and other soybean defoliatorsDry weather encourages grasshoppers. As with spider mites, infestations often begin along field borders. Grasshoppers are much easier to kill when they are small, so timely treatment is helpful. A general defoliation threshold can be used for all leaf-feeding insects in soybean regardless of species. These insects include Japanese beetles, grasshoppers, green cloverworms, and various other caterpillars. If soybeans are in pre-bloom they can tolerate up to 40% defoliation before treatment is advised, and 15% defoliation from bloom to pod-fill. These percentages refer to whole-plant defoliation, not just a few leaves.A word to the wise about treating for defoliators: a good reason to avoid pulling the trigger on a spray too soon, apart from simple economics, is that many pyrethroid products will actually make spider mite problems worse. We often see the most intense spider mite flare-ups in fields that have been treated with a broad-spectrum pyrethroid, particularly when environmental conditions favor them anyway. Western bean cutwormWe have had a fair number of trap catches in early July, which suggests that we are entering a period of intense flight. With the heat, peak flight occurred by in mid-July. Over the next few weeks, corn should be inspected every four to five days for the presence of egg masses. Check 10 corn plants in 10 different locations — if greater than 8% of those have egg masses, treatment may be necessary. Controlling western bean cutworm is more difficult after the larvae enter the ear, so good egg scouting is critical to prevent ear damage.last_img read more

52nd Ohio Ag Hall of Fame inductees announced

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Agricultural Council (OAC) recently announced the 2017 Ohio Agricultural Hall of Fame inductees, including Dwight B. Beougher of Westerville, James J. Buchy of Greenville, Opal Holfinger of Troy, and Virgil L.  Strickler of Lakeview. These individuals  who have committed their lives to working in, promoting and advocating for Ohio’s farm community will be inducted as the 52nd Hall of Fame class on Friday, August 4, 2017, during a special breakfast ceremony at the Ohio Expo Center.“Our Executive Board is very pleased to be honoring such outstanding individuals, whose passion, creativity and hard work epitomize those qualities sought in inductees for the Ohio Agricultural Hall of Fame,” said Jim Chakeres, OAC president. “Each stands out individually for exceptional contributions, and their collective decades of service have truly impacted Ohio agriculture.”Induction will take place in the Cardinal Hall on the fairgrounds, which opened in 2016 and features an expanded Hall of Fame display and salute to Ohio’s agriculture community. The following four inductees will join 221 prior recipients named since 1966 when the program began.Dwight B. Beougher of WestervilleDwight Beougher has dedicated his life to serving the US feed industry and agriculture. His career in product sales began with twenty years at a major research and animal feed manufacturer, where he especially enjoyed teaching dealers and employees good manufacturing practices and animal husbandry. Later, he and his wife created a successful retail feed and farm supply business in central Ohio and were recognized nationally for their turn-around strategies.  Dwight served as chairman of the Ohio Feed & Grain Dealer’s Association’s Feed Committee where he headed up rewriting the “Ohio Feed Law.”Combining his love of agriculture, education and communication, Dwight now retired, has been instrumental in many programs as president of the Franklin County Farm Bureau.  He continues to engage and share the story about his favorite subject — agriculture.James J. Buchy of GreenvilleJames “Jim” Buchy is valued as a true statesman and a selfless leader who has served the state and agriculture in many ways.  Jim grew up in Greenville working in and later owning his family’s meat packing plant as the fifth generation. Called to public service, he served in the Ohio House of Representatives for 22 years and later as an assistant director in the Ohio Department of Agriculture.Serving on the Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee during his Ohio House tenure, Jim assisted other legislators in understanding agriculture, worked to create a favorable business environment in the state, protected the environment; all while pushing the agricultural industry for continual improvement and growth. Jim’s work also invested in the youth of Ohio through legislation that brought 4-H and FFA programs to students in urban areas.Opal Holfinger of TroyOpal Holfinger has shared her quiet leadership for the betterment of Ohio agriculture and the state of Ohio through thousands of volunteer hours. For more than five and a half decades, Opal and her late husband Carl, fed cattle in Miami County. As a staunch advocate of Ohio’s beef industry, she served on the Ohio Beef Council Operating Committee from 1988-1996, helping shape the state’s beef council in the very early years of the national beef checkoff program. She also served in many capacities for the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association, Ohio Cattle Women, and the Miami County Cattlemen’s Association.Opal’s service extended into board leadership for 15 years and as treasurer of the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation, Miami County Planning Commission and Zoning Board, Ohio Bicentennial Board and the Ohio Expositions Commission.Virgil L. Strickler of LakeviewVirgil Strickler has a lifetime of experience in the agricultural industry and serves as the longest-running General Manager in the history of the Ohio Expo Center & State Fair. Raised on a farm in Fairfield County, Virgil began his career as an agricultural lender.  In 1993, he was named Livestock and Agriculture Director of the Ohio State Fair, and Strickler also has served since 2004 as the General Manager.Virgil has been passionate about supporting and educating Ohio’s youth about agriculture, as demonstrated through the 4th grade Ag is Cool program and the Youth Reserve Program for livestock participants, which created a multi-million dollar scholarship program.  Strickler has created one of the top fairs in the nation, allowing the general public to better connect with the number-one industry in Ohio.The Ohio Agricultural Hall of Fame induction annually attracts more than 500 guests to honor the Ohio agricultural community and the select inductees dedicated to Ohio’s largest industry.For further information about sponsorship in honor of the inductees, or to obtain tickets to the Agricultural Hall of Fame induction ceremony, contact the Ohio Agricultural Council at 614-794-8970 or via email at info@ohioagcouncil.org.last_img read more

Updated field guide available

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The newly revised Corn, Soybean, Wheat, and Forages Field Guide is a compilation of the latest research by Extension specialists from The Ohio State University in partnership with Pennsylvania State University.Designed as a guide for scouts, crop advisors, and farmers, this handy spiral-bound book contains updated information and images to aid with insect, disease, and weed identification. Major revisions to the book include the latest fertilizer recommendations, broadleaf weed ID keys, and a manure sampling and manure applicator calibration section. Tar spot, a new disease to Ohio, is now included in the Corn Disease section. The Forages section also received a major upgrade, and now includes grass crops as well.The guide is divided into six sections: Corn Management, Soybean Management, Wheat Management, Forage Management, Weed Identification, and General Crop Management, which includes updated sampling information. The index at the back of the Bulletin 827 can be used to quickly locate page numbers for your topic of interest while in the field.The Field Guide should be available in Extension offices very soon, or to purchase the hard copy now on-line: https://extensionpubs.osu.edu/corn-soybean-wheat-and-forages-field-guide/, for the digital version: https://extensionpubs.osu.edu/corn-soybean-wheat-and-forages-field-guide-pdf/. The price is $14.75 for the hard copy and $8 for the digital version. Discounts are available for quantity purchases.last_img read more

Customize Default Effects in Final Cut Pro X

first_imgApple’s recent Final Cut Pro X update includes a convenient new feature that allows users to easily assign default audio and video effects to their clips using a simple keyboard shortcut. Let’s take a look at how it works.With the latest version of Final Cut Pro X, Apple is certainly not attempting to reinvent the wheel. For the most part, the update includes bug fixes, performance enhancements, and other new features, such as the ability to output to multiple YouTube clips at once. But one of the more interesting additions to 10.2.3, one that will make certain editorial tasks easier and more convenient, is Final Cut Pro X’s ability to customize default effects.Many of you are probably already familiar with Final Cut Pro X’s default transitions as a result of using the shortcut CMD+T. With a clip selected, this will automatically apply a cross dissolve, giving editors a very fluid method for applying a transition without using their mouse.Some of you probably also know that you can right-click on any transition in the Transitions Browser and set it to your default. So for example, if you want to use a wipe transition on multiple clips, you can replace the cross dissolve transition with a wipe, allowing you to make use of your keyboard shortcut.With the latest version of Final Cut Pro X, you can do the same for color or audio effects. By default, Final Cut Pro X will now apply a basic color corrector to your clip when you hit Option+E and will apply a channel EQ to your audio when you hit Command+Option+E.Default Transition = Command+TDefault Color Effect = Option+EDefault Video Effect = Command+Option+EMuch like how default transitions work, you can set any color effect or any audio effect to be the default setting, effectively overriding the current presets. For instance, if you often need to use a black-and-white color effect to preview a certain look, it might be worth assigning that to your keyboard shortcut as a means to quickly see how a clip will work in monochrome. Alternatively, you might want to add some reverb to a bunch of your audio tracks for stylistic effect, and can do the same using this method.For a quick demo on how this works, check out this video from Ripple Training, which outlines the new feature:What’s your favorite default transition? Share in the comments below.last_img read more

Three fined for stealing lotuses

first_imgA kangaroo court in western Assam’s Barpeta district made three people cough up ₹15,000 for stealing lotuses from a wetland.One of Assam’s prime wetlands, with 39 species of indigenous fish, the 91-hectare Kapla Beel has been a major source of income for the villages around it. The wetland is also known for its lotuses that the villagers protect.But the lotuses – as buds or in bloom – kept vanishing for a week before Durga Puja. The villagers formed a vigilante group and on October 4 caught three people from a neighbouring village under Sarthebari police station. The men were let go but on the condition they face a kangaroo court comprising elders of the two biggest villages adjoining the wetland. A couple of days ago, the court decided to penalise the three with a fine of ₹5,000 each for stealing the aquatic flowers. “We did not intervene as the trial did not involve any physical assault or violation of law. The three were flower traders and had been harvesting the lotuses without permission from the stakeholders,” a local police officer said.last_img read more