Manipur ‘extra-judicial’ killings: will try to reconstitute Bench, says CJI

first_imgThe Supreme Court on Thursday agreed to reconstitute a Bench to continue monitoring a CBI probe into alleged extra-judicial killings by the Army, the Assam Rifles and the police in Manipur when insurgency was at its peak.The case has been in the back-burner since Justice Madan B. Lokur, who led the earlier two-judge Bench, retired in December last. Justice U.U. Lalit was the companion judge on that Bench.Senior advocate Colin Gonsalves, for the victims’ families and petitioners, made an urgent mention before Chief Justice of India (CJI) Ranjan Gogoi, apprising him of the fact that the case had not come up in a while.Mr. Gonsalves submitted that he had first mentioned the matter before Justice Lalit, who told him to mention it before the CJI. The CJI alone had the administrative power to constitute Benches to hear cases.“We will try to reconstitute the Bench,” the CJI told Mr. Gonsalves.In 2017, the court ordered a CBI probe into the alleged 1,528 extra-judicial killings from 2000 to 2012. The last few hearings saw the Justice Lokur Bench facing pressure to recuse himself from the case.This was in the form of a plea by serving and retired Army officers that there was a perception of judicial bias caused by certain oral comments made by the judges in court. The plea claimed that certain oral remarks of the Bench in an earlier hearing, reported widely in the media, questioning the non-arrest of accused persons, spooked the Army personnel operating in the State. Incidentally, the plea was fully supported by the Centre. Attorney General K.K. Venugopal had pitched in, saying that “more soldiers are killed than insurgents”.But the court’s amicus curiae in the case, advocate Menaka Guruswamy, and Mr. Gonsalves, had assured the Bench that the plea was merely an attempt to “overawe” the court.Finally, the Bench, in a detailed judgment in November 2018, refused to withdraw from the case. It concluded that the plea was unfounded. It said the oral observations were not intended to compromise the independence of the CBI probe.last_img read more

Djiboutis Breakdown of Rule of Law Threatens Investment

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: Government of Djibouti Djibouti’s recent action to denounce the international Rule of Law is calling into question any investment in the country both now and in the future, Dubai-based port and terminal operator DP World said. Later this week, the government of Djibouti is to take a decision to apply to the country’s high court to rule all previous international adjudications null and void.DP World believes that this is “a complete disregard for and contravention of the global legal system and existing contracts.”Last year, Djibouti terminated the concession contract with DP World for the operation of the Doraleh Container Terminal SA (DCT). DP World controlled 33.34% in DCT and Port de Djibouti S.A., an entity of the Republic of Djibouti, 66.66%.As a result, DP World launched an arbitration case against the country’s government. Although DP World has been successful in previous substantial rulings by the London Court for International Arbitration (LCIA) and the High Court of England and Wales, Djibouti ignored all of them despite the original contract for the concession being written under English law.The most recent decision by the LCIA on March 29 this year found that by developing new container port opportunities with China Merchants Port Holdings, a Hong-Kong based port operator, Djibouti has breached DCT’s rights under its 2006 Concession Agreement to develop a container terminal at Doraleh, specifically, its exclusivity over all container handling facilities in the territory of Djibouti.The tribunal ordered Djibouti to pay DCT USD 385.7 million plus interest for breach of DCT’s exclusivity, with further damages possible if Djibouti develops a planned Doraleh International Container Terminal (DICT) with any other operator without the consent of DP World.The tribunal also ordered Djibouti to pay DCT USD 88 million for historic non-payment of royalties for container traffic not transferred to DCT once it became operational. Djibouti is also ordered to pay DCT’s legal costs.The court recognized that the 2006 concession agreement remains valid and binding.“DCT and DP World continue to seek to uphold their legal rights in a number of legal fora, following Djibouti’s unlawful efforts to expel DP World from Djibouti and transfer the port operation to Chinese interests,” DP World said in a statement, adding that litigation against China Merchants also continues before the Hong Kong courts.last_img read more