Sports Briefs

first_imgPacquiao to return April 9 against Bradley LAS VEGAS (AP): Manny Pacquiao will return to the ring April 9 for the first time since losing to Floyd Mayweather Jr., and it will be against a familiar foe. Promoter Bob Arum said Wednesday that Pacquiao will fight Timothy Bradley at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas for a third time in his first bout since losing a decision to Mayweather in the richest fight ever. Pacquiao re-injured a shoulder in that fight and was ineffective against Mayweather in dropping the unanimous decision. Technically, the fight with Bradley will be the rubber match of their three-fight series. However, most in boxing believe Pacquiao won the first fight in 2012 easily – the judges gave it to Bradley – and was largely dominant in the rematch, which he won by decision. Top rank spokesman Lee Samuels said the pay-per-view fight has not officially been signed, but that both fighters had agreed to terms and would be signing soon. Pacquiao was given a $2 million advance on his guaranteed $20 million purse, Samuels said. Messi scores in 500th game for Barca BARCELONA, Spain (AP): Lionel Messi scored in his 500th match for Barcelona to help them ease past Real Betis 4-0 on Wednesday and ensure they kept the lead of the Spanish league to conclude a superb year for the Catalan club. Barcelona broke a run of consecutive draws in the league to cap one of their best years in club history. Before kick-off Andres Iniesta paraded the recently won Club World Cup trophy, their fifth title won in 2015. The four goals scored took the year’s tally to 180, bettering Madrid’s milestone of 178 from 2014. “It was a spectacular year, and we wanted to finish it in the same way,” Messi said. “It will be complicated to better this, but like always we will try to do so.” Messi recovered from a hard knock with Antonio Adan that was ruled a penalty against the Betis goalkeeper, by scoring Barcelona’s second goal, after an own goal put the Catalan side on its way. CAS rejects appeal from Musa Bility LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP): The Court of Arbitration for Sport has dismissed Musa Bility’s appeal to overturn his exclusion from the FIFA presidential election. Bility, who is from Liberia, failed to make the field after failing an integrity check. FIFA’s election monitoring panel ruled the Liberian football federation president ineligible last month. No reason was publicly given, but Bility said a previous criminal allegation against him was dismissed by a Liberian court. CAS says it will release the grounds for its decision early this year. FIFA has approved five candidates for the election to be held on February 26. Michel Platini, who has been handed an eight-year ban but still hopes to run for FIFA presidency, is also expected to appeal to CAS. Monfils out of Hopman Cup with leg injury PERTH, Australia (AP): Gael Monfils has withdrawn from the Hopman Cup mixed team event due to an unspecified leg injury and will be replaced by French compatriot Kenny de Schepper. It was not clear whether the injury would prevent the 24th-ranked Monfils from competing in the Australian Open beginning January 18 in Melbourne. Hopman Cup tournament director Paul Kilderry said yesterday “it’s unfortunate to hear Gael is unable to play in Perth … we wish him well over the next couple of weeks ahead of the Aussie Open.” De Schepper and his partner Caroline Garcia play their first match Monday against the Britain team of Andy Murray and Heather Watson. Serena Williams and Jack Sock open for the United States, also on Monday, against Elina Svitolina and Alexandr Dolgopolov of Ukraine.last_img read more

Nigerian artist wins prestigious South African art prize

first_imgPeju Alatise is the 2017 winner of the FNB Art Prize. The Nigerian mixed-medium artist explores strong African narratives with a focus on the experiences of contemporary African women.Peju Alatise’s mixed-medium installation Flying Girls was exhibited at the Venice Biennale in June 2017. (Image: Peju Alatise)CD AndersonAlatise’s various early paintings, later sculptures and current installations will be the showcase exhibit at the tenth annual FNB Joburg Art Fair, to be held in Sandton from 8-10 September 2017.The fair, one of South Africa’s leading art events, will feature more than 60 exhibitions across five categories, including traditional and modern art. Artists and cultural organisations from 11 countries, including the United States, will be part of the event.Alatise’s work was nominated for the award by Johannesburg’s Red Door Gallery. Gallery founder Bola Asiru felt that her work best communicated both the African and female experience. “Peju’s work is filled with strong societal narratives on the realities of life in Africa,” Asiru said.Born in 1975 in Lagos, Nigeria, Alatise studied architecture before being inspired by the jarring and honest visual art of fellow Nigerian artist David Dale. She later trained with Dale, as well as worked with traditional artisans around Africa, learning to incorporate materials such as beads, cloth and natural resins into her increasingly ambitious works.Alatise has exhibited around the world, including at the Smithsonian Institute of African Art in the US and the Venice Biennale in Italy, one of the world’s longest running and most respected art events. Her earlier paintings and more recent multimedia pieces are also in a number of private collections as well as permanent exhibits around the world.“It’s time for [her] message to be taken to the rest of Africa and there is no better platform for this than the FNB Joburg Art Fair,” Asiru said.“[The Biennale is the] highest level of exhibiting an artist can be honoured with,” Alatise told CNN earlier this year. “It is the Olympics of the arts.” The particular work exhibited in Venice, titled Flying Girls, is an eight-sculpture installation of winged girls in mid-flight, representing “a strong societal narrative on the realities faced by women in Africa”. The piece will on show at the Joburg Art Fair.Peju Alatise’s mixed-medium installation Flying Girls was exhibited at the Venice Biennale in June 2017. (Image: Peju Alatise)Announcing her win on its website, the Art Fair describes Alatise’s work as “installations using materials such as cloth, beads, wood, cement and resin. Addressing several social, political and gender-related issues as her primary subject matter, her works have also captured the joys and pain of womanhood as experienced in modern-life-African traditions, with all their consequences. Her subject matter has evolved with her continued experiences, moving her focus from advocating the equal rights of women to broader political and philosophical issues.”Speaking about Alatise’s winning contribution to the Joburg Art Fair, jury member Pulane Kingston from Webber Wentzel Attorneys said the judges were unanimous. “The quality of all shortlisted candidate proposals was high this year, but… Peju Alatise’s proposal… stood out. The innovative, universal social relevance and poignancy in the themes underpinning her work were some of the deciding factors in tipping the scales in her favour.“The body of her work over the years has been varied and compositionally strong and we think that it palpably reflects the intense vibrancy of the African continent. We have no doubt that the integrity of the overall body of her work will propel her career meaningfully.”As sponsor of the award and the event, Aneesa Razack, CEO of FNB Share Investing, said Alatise’s work was a fine representation of the bank’s commitment to art in Africa. “We recognise that artistic expression involves creativity and imagination, which we know to be key drivers of innovation… the social and political commentary of Alatise’s work embodies so much of what we hope to find in the recipient of the prize.”Read an indepth interview with Peju Alatise by Aljazeera here. For more information about the Joburg Art Fair, visit the website here. View more of Peju Alatise’s work on her personal website here. Source: All Africa, FNB, Joburg Art FairWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

SA paddlers take on world’s longest canoe race

first_img “Sleep deprivation was the biggest one,” he said of the challenges he faced in 2007. “Obviously you have to be very fit. You start hallucinating, there is tendonitis in your wrists, sore bums from sitting down the whole time. “The river is quite dangerous,” he added. “You can’t go too close to the bank. Branches and massive trees fall out, so they are 30 metres into the river and you can’t see the branches and the river is flowing really fast, and you get hooked up in those. The water temperature is four or five degrees.”A bigger boat Due to the nature of the race, it is entirely possible that, apart from the start, they might not see any of their fellow competitors at all along the route. The vast distance and the tough requirements of the test that lies in weight means the Dung Beetles have to use a bigger boat than usual. “It’s a sea kayak,” Paul explained , “bigger than our kayaks because you’ve got a long list of mandatory things you have to take, like tents, sleeping bags, two stoves, three weeks of food, bear spray, flares. It has two hatches, so you are taking a lot of kit. “The boat will weight from 80 to 100 kilograms by the time we are packed up and ready to start. It’s an expedition.”Spot devices The duo will also carry two Spot devices with them, in case one of the tracking gadgets breaks down. The devices allow them to be tracked by satellite. Every day, they must stop paddling by 23:00, when it gets dark, and within 15 minutes they must press their device. The competitors are allowed to start paddling the next morning at 05:00, when it becomes light again. They must press the Spot device every six hours. In case of an emergency, the Spot devices contain a rescue mechanism, which would alert the Coast Guard on the United States side of the border and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Canada.Goal Paul and Boshoff have spent six months preparing for the Yukon 1 000, putting in training sessions of up to 100 kilometres a day. They’re planning to finish the distance in eight days, although seven days would be something they would be very pleased with, said Paul. The race record is six-and-a-half days. Keeping up their energy will be vital to achieving their goals and finishing the race, he added. Food “We both trained by going to a dietician. Our intake is all based on calories and what you are burning up every day, so we have balanced that out,” Paul said. “You can’t replace the calories as fast as you are burning them. We eat every half- hour, or at least every hour. A lot of that comes from energy drinks, probably 75 percent. You have to drink about half-a-litre every hour. You have to drink at least eight litres every day. That’s what we plan to do.” Paul’s and Boshoff’s progress can be tracked on their blog – The South African Dung Beetles Blog 17 July 2014 Only 12 teams have been brave enough to enter this year’s edition of the longest canoe race in the world, the Yukon 1 000 – meaning 1 000 miles (1 600 kilometres) – and they include the “South African Dung Beetles”, Duncan Paul and Donovan Boshoff of the Natal Canoe Club. The event starts in Whitehorse, the capital of the Yukon, in Alaska, and concludes at the Alaska Pipeline/Dalton Highway after seven to 12 days of paddling for 18 hours a day. Clearly, it is not for the faint of heart.Unsupported As an unsupported race, the contestants have to look out for their own wellbeing and that means carrying three weeks of food supplies. “You have to take three weeks of food with you because if you have bad weather conditions or someone gets injured there is no way you can be helped out there,” Paul said at a send-off function in Pietermaritzburg on Tuesday. On Wednesday, he and Boshoff jetted off on their way to Canada for the start of the Yukon 1 000, which takes place from Monday, 21 July. Paul previously took part in the Yukon River Quest in 2007, completing the mammoth 740 kilometre journey with fellow Natal Canoe Club member Colin Burden in 50 hours, while taking only one seven-hour and one three-hour break along the way.Useful knowledge Thanks to that previous experience, Paul explained, he learned some useful things, like the kinds of trials he and Boshoff can expect to face in the even longer Yukon 1 000. last_img read more

Ag Big Winner in Japan Deal

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Chris ClaytonDTN Ag Policy EditorOMAHA (DTN) — Japan will lower or eliminate tariffs on roughly half of all U.S. agricultural and food exports to Japan, according to a deal signed Wednesday by President Donald Trump. This deal provides the U.S. with parity to what other countries received in the Trans Pacific Partnership.The Trump administration said the agreement would lower or eliminate tariffs into Japan’s markets for about $7 billion in agricultural products.“Japanese tariffs will now be significantly lower or eliminated completely on beef, pork, wheat, cheese, corn, wine and so much more,” President Trump said at a signing ceremony in New York with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.The trade agreement would mean “Really big dollars for our farmers and for our ranchers,” Trump said.The U.S. Grains Council stated the trade deal would “solidify our longstanding partnership for the future and create a platform for growth into new sales and new sectors, including the potential for sales of U.S. ethanol.”Currently, the U.S. exports about $14 billion in agricultural and food products to Japan, of which about $5.2 billion are already duty free, according to the U.S. Trade Representative’s Office. Under the deal, Japan will reduce or eliminate tariffs on another $7.2 billion in agricultural or food products.Once the agreement is implemented by Japan, U.S. farmers and ranchers will have a level playing field selling into Japan, such as other countries that joined the Trans Pacific Partnership have. The National Pork Producers Council cited Iowa State University economist Dermot Hayes projecting that pork sales would increase from about $1.6 billion annually to $2.2 billion over the next 15 years due to lower duties.Under the agreement, more than 90% of U.S. agricultural products and food exported to Japan will be either duty free or have lower tariff barriers. A fact sheet from the White House stated the deal would immediately eliminate tariffs for almonds, blueberries, broccoli, cranberries, grain sorghum, sweet corn, walnuts and other products.Fresh and frozen beef and pork will see lower tariffs as well. Japan will have some “safeguards” in place to avoid surges of imports of beef, pork and certain other products. Reuters noted Japan would provide lower tariffs on about 240,000 metric tons of beef, or about 90% of what the U.S. exports to Japan. U.S. beef producers were seeking to lower the tariff from 38.5% down to 9% to match what competitors such as Canada and Australia pay exporting to Japan.Wheat and wheat products will receive a specific quota for lower tariff rates.Some products will see tariffs reduced or eliminated in stages, such as cheeses, processed pork, beef offal, ethanol, wine, frozen potatoes, oranges, fresh cherries, egg products and tomato paste.In return, Japan will also see lower tariffs or elimination of tariffs for more than 40 agricultural products, including perennial plants and flowers, teas and soy sauces. The U.S. will also lower or reduce tariffs on industrial products such as certain machines, steam turbines, bicycles and parts, and musical instruments.The U.S. and Japan also have reached a separate agreement on some issues with digital trade such as music, videos, e-books, software and games. The plan is expected to open up “barrier-free cross-border data transfers in all sectors” of the economy. The White House noted, “The digital trade agreement with Japan meets the gold standard on digital trade rules set by the USMCA and will expand trade in an area where the United States is a leader.”The U.S. Chamber of Commerce called the announcement a “partial U.S.-Japan trade deal” that would help farmers and ranchers, as well as the digital economy. But Myron Brilliant, executive vice president and head of international affairs for the Chamber, said the trade deal doesn’t go far enough. The Chamber called for a more comprehensive agreement dealing with issues such as intellectual property protection and regulatory barriers.“A comprehensive trade deal with Japan would provide some much needed predictability — not only for the U.S. and Japan but for all our trade allies. Now is the moment for our countries to work together to restore stability to the rules-based global trading system,” Brilliant said.Chris Clayton can be reached at chris.clayton@dtn.comFollow him on Twitter @ChrisClaytonDTN(CZ)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more