Lamb’s final-day record underscores Jamaica superiority at 48th CARIFTA Games

first_imgGEORGE TOWN, Cayman Islands (CMC) – Deshaun Lamb’s record-breaking run in the Under-17 Boys sprint hurdles underlined Jamaica’s dominance as the perennial powerhouse once again showcased their superiority on the final day of the 48th CARIFTA Games here Easter Monday.Jamaica swept all four sprint hurdles and relay finals early in the evening session before returning to put an exclamation mark on proceedings by also winning all four distance relays, at the Truman Bodden Sports Complex.In fact, the Jamaicans won 17 of the 21 events in the final session to finish the championship with 85 medals overall – 36 gold, 33 silver and 16 bronze.Lamb’s performance epitomised his country’s swagger as he raced to a new time of 13.54 seconds, eclipsing countryman Vashaun Vascianna’s 13.60 set last year in The Bahamas.Running out of lane four, Lamb was pushed all the way by teammate Niel-Matthew Sutherland, and crossed the line only narrowly ahead.Sutherland took silver in 13.61 while Matthew Sophia of Curacao grabbed bronze in 13.64.Rasheed Broadbell also led a Jamaica one-two in the Under-20 Boys sprint hurdles when he won in 13.26 – just outside of Wilhem Belocian’s five-year-old record of 13.23.Running out of lane three, Broadbell started well, stumbled slightly when he crashed hurdle number three but stayed composed enough to recover and reach the line ahead of Vascianna in 13.32.Kay-Lagay Clarke ensured another Jamaican sweep of the top two spots in the Under-17 Girls when she stopped the clock in 13.68 to win gold ahead of teammate Crystal Shaw (13.72).Ackera Nugent, who claimed silver last year in the Under-17s, grabbed gold in the Under-20 Girls, winning in a time of 13.24.Jamaica also lived up to their high billing in the sprint relays. The team of Shaw, Clarke, Brianna Lyston and Glacian Loutin combined to open the account with victory in the Under-17 Girls age group, winning in a time of 45.63.They were not without a challenge, however, as Trinidad and Tobago pushed them all the way, especially on the anchor leg where Taejha Badal produced a searing run but just missed out.There was no such drama in the corresponding Boys final as Christopher Scott, on the third leg, got the stick to anchor Bouwajhie Nkrumie first, leaving the last 80 metres as a straightforward affair.Double sprint champion, Brianna Williams, then set in train her eventual capture of the Austin Sealy Award for the second straight year when she produced a fluent first leg in the Under-20 Girls final, as Jamaica took another uncomplicated victory in 44.25.Trinidad and Tobago were a distant second in 45.11 with Barbados holding on to bronze in 45.52.Jamaica faced their stiffest competition in the Boys Under-20s with Ryiem Robertson forced to chase down Bahamian Joel Johnson before catching him on the line, to win a thriller in 39.46, which was just outside of the CARIFTA record.The contest on the backstretch seemed between Jamaica and Trinidad until Adrian Curry Jr produced a blistering third leg for The Bahamas to bring them into contention.They were forced to settle for silver in 39.49 while Barbados held bronze in 40.18.For the second straight year, Kevroy Venson of Jamaica took gold in the gruelling Boys 5 000 metres but made it look easy, producing a trademark kick over the last 100 metres to cross the line in 15 minutes 21.30 seconds.The field events were not spared Jamaica’s wrath either. Rajuan Ricketts conjured up success in the Boys Under-17 triple jump when he measured 14.26 metres while Cobe Graham sustained the dominance with a throw of 18.62m to win the Under-20 Boys shot put.In the Girls Under-17 discus, Cedricka Williams measured 47.94m to lead a Jamaica one-two, with Damali Williams grabbing silver with 40.87m.Jamaica also swept the top two spots in the corresponding Boys event as Cobe Lawrence threw 53.32 for gold while Christopher Young took silver in 51.34.last_img read more

Syracuse football opponent preview: What to know about Duke

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on November 15, 2019 at 7:29 pm Contact Andrew: aegraham@syr.edu | @A_E_Graham Syracuse (3-6, 0-5 Atlantic Coast) visits Durham, North Carolina for a 4 p.m. kickoff with conference foe Duke (4-5, 2-3). The Orange and Blue Devils have barely played in the history of the two programs, with three matchups ever and the last coming in 2014. If Syracuse is to make a bowl, Duke is the first of three teams — Louisville and Wake Forest — that SU must beat in order to become bowl eligible. Here’s everything to know about the Blue Devils, the Orange’s first stop on their must-win path to the postseason.Gambling Odds: As of Friday night, Duke is a 10.5-point favorite, with a total of 54, per Pinnacle.All-time series: Duke leads, 3-0.The last time they played: The Blue Devils triumphed over the Orange, 27-10, in the Carrier Dome in 2014. It was the two teams’ first meeting in the modern era — the first two came prior to World War II, in 1938-39 — and first as conference opponents. Syracuse, hamstrung by injury, played reserve quarterbacks Austin Wilson and Mitch Kimble and could only muster 10 points while Duke got two touchdowns from wideout Issac Blakeney and a punt return touchdown from Jamison Crowder. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe Duke report: The Blue Devils feature dual-threat quarterback Quentin Harris at the helm of their offense. Syracuse defensive tackle Kenneth Ruff said film on Harris brought him flashbacks of Lamar Jackson in 2016. While Harris might not be Heisman-caliber, he’s certainly going to pose a problem for a Syracuse defense that’s prone to biting on play-fakes and getting fooled by run-pass options. To date, Harris is the Blue Devils second-leading rusher behind running back Deon Jackson. He leads the team with 224.4 yards per game and has had a hand in 20 of Duke’s 30 touchdowns this season.Currently, the Blue Devils are sliding, losers of four of their last five. Harris is the best bet to get back in the win column at home.How Syracuse wins: Limit Harris’ ability to run and establish your own run game. Coming off the idle week, a rested and coached up offensive line and some clever play calling could get SU’s running attack going against a relatively soft Blue Devils front. The Orange have barely run the ball consistently this season, but if they can use Moe Neal, Abdul Adams and Jarveon Howard — Tommy DeVito, too? — effectively and get going down hill, they can hopefully open up the rest of the offense.The defense is, by far, Syracuse’s biggest question mark coming into this game after Dino Babers fired defensive coordinator Brian Ward. What will interim coordinator and former defensive ends coach Steve Stanard have cooked up? Players spoke all week of increased effort and Babers on Monday said he wanted to see “something different.” Whatever it might be from Stanard and the defense, it’ll likely center around erasing Harris’ ability to escape the pocket and make the defense pay on the ground. If they can contain him, it’ll force Duke to look outside the box to move the ball.Player to watch: Harris, redshirt senior quarterback, No. 18The Blue Devils successor to Daniel Jones — the No. 6 pick in the NFL Draft — has put together an impressive campaign running and throwing the football. Besides accounting for two-third of Duke’s touchdowns, Harris has completed his passes at a 60.6% rate and rushed for more than 400 yards to date.  Commentslast_img read more