UCLA not in favorite situation

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREChargers go winless in AFC West with season-ending loss in Kansas CityAnd UCLA’s five seasons under Coach Karl Dorrell suggest it is possible. After the Bruins, as 16-point favorites, were ambushed by 38 points last month at Utah, and with a string of defeats as a heavy favorite pasted on Dorrell’s resume, losing to the Irish (0-5) doesn’t seem as outlandish as the storied Notre Dame program opening the season with five losses. “(Notre Dame) is a lot better than their record,” UCLA quarterback Ben Olson said. “They’re an athletic team. They’re not a bad team in any sense. We have to go out there and respect them. We’ve been in situations before where the team has been a little bit down and we made them look like superstars. We need to make sure that doesn’t happen.” UCLA (4-1) is a 201/2-point favorite, and excels at home, where it has won 14 of its last 15 games. However, a UCLA-induced condition is prevalent whenever the Bruins are big favorites. Dorrell’s record is 33-22, but half of those losses came when UCLA was favored, and the 44-6 loss at Utah is not an isolated incident. The Bruins were 14-point favorites and lost at home to Washington State in 2004, and as a 12-point favorite lost to Wyoming in the Las Vegas Bowl to close that season. COLLEGE FOOTBALL: Bruins’ history means Notre Dame has a shot. By Brian Dohn STAFF WRITER Nearly 83 years have passed since Notre Dame’s four horseman traveled 2,000 miles to play Stanford in the granddaddy of all bowl games, but tonight, when the Irish return to the Rose Bowl, they will try to pull the mother of all upsets against UCLA. There is also the debacle in the desert, when the seventh-ranked and 8-0 Bruins, as nine-point favorites, were beaten by 38 points at Arizona in 2005. The common theme in many of those losses was it followed a strong effort, and the Bruins are coming off a 40-14 win at Oregon State. Now, the Irish enter today as, statistically, one of the worst teams in the nation. “We can’t take them lightly, because if we do, we can have another Utah relapse,” said UCLA defensive end Bruce Davis, who doesn’t anticipate another lackluster performance. “When we’re in the huddle, and I’m looking at the other 10 guys in the huddle, it’s like they want it. It’s like these guys are hungry and they haven’t eaten in a week. “I don’t know if you watch Discovery Channel during shark week, but it’s like we’ve got great whites out there. These guys are ready for some blood.” And the Irish offense is hemorrhaging. Notre Dame, which has scored 46 points this season, is 119th and last in the nation in rushing offense (30.4 yards per game) and sacks allowed (5.8 per game). The Irish are 118th in total offense (194.8 ypg) and scoring (9.2 ppg), and 106 in passing offense (164.4 ypg). “Right now we’re 0-5, but our outlook on things are still very positive,” Notre Dame running back Travis Thomas said. “Everyone is still working hard and everyone still believes we can win. We’re still going out there with the mind-set and the belief that we can win, and we’re going to win when we step on the field.” UCLA players said all week motivation came in many forms, including the memories of the Utah game, and last year’s collapse at Notre Dame Stadium. After throttling Notre Dame quarterback Brady Quinn for 59 minutes, all of UCLA’s good vibes were sliced apart in 35 seconds. That’s how long it took the Irish to go 80 yards, and to take a 20-17 lead with 27 seconds left as a flailing UCLA secondary allowed Jeff Samardzija to catch and run for a 45-yard touchdown. “I’m still bitter about that,” said UCLA left guard Shannon Tevaga, who is returning after missing two games with a knee injury. “Not until we beat them, and beat them badly (will Tevaga get over the loss). I wanted to play in this game.” This will mark Notre Dame’s second game at the now-world famous stadium, but it comes with a vastly different goal. When Notre Dame played Jan. 1, 1925, its 27-10 defeat of Stanford gave the school its first national championship. When the Irish meet the Bruins today, the only thing on Notre Dame’s mind is ending the worst start in the school’s history. But the question may not be whether the Irish are ready to finally win, but whether UCLA has finally learned how not to lose. brian.dohn@dailynews.com160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

RORY GALLAGHER ADDS BRENDAN KILCOYNE TO HIS DONEGAL BACKROOM TEAM

first_imgDonegal manager Rory Gallagher has appointed Brendan Kilcoyne to his backroom staff for the forthcoming 2016 season. Kilcoyne, has vast experience and has won Donegal SFC titles with St Eunan’s as a player and manager.He has also worked on the Donegal U21 set-up in recent years under Maxi Curran. Gallagher has been looking to add to his staff – and there were suggestions in some quarters that Francie Friel was set to join the backroom team.However, it is Kilcoyne that will replace Gary McDaid who opted off the panel this year due to family commitments.Donegal will start training collectively again next month ahead of the Dr McKenna Cup in January.The Allianz National League campaign kicks off at the end of January.   RORY GALLAGHER ADDS BRENDAN KILCOYNE TO HIS DONEGAL BACKROOM TEAM was last modified: November 11th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:GAASportlast_img read more

Australia sees record highs in syphilis cases and hepatitis deaths

first_imgPublic health experts in Australia are sounding alarms over a record number of new cases of syphilis and a dramatic rise in viral hepatitis deaths. Experts trace the spike in syphilis and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) to a decrease in condom use, particularly among men who have sex with men (MSM), and they see the hepatitis death toll as the inevitable result of long-term trends in injecting drug use.The alarming numbers and the underlying behaviors are examined in a pair of reports on HIV, viral hepatitis, and STIs in Australia released today by the Kirby Institute for Infection and Immunity in Society and the Centre for Social Research in Health, both at the University of New South Wales in Sydney. “Unfortunately, it’s really bad news for STIs in Australia,” says epidemiologist David Wilson of the Kirby Institute. 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Physicians reported 82,537 new cases in 2013, with males only slightly more likely to be victims than females. And that number “is just the tip of the iceberg,” Wilson says. Those infected often don’t have symptoms or don’t recognize them and never get diagnosed or treated. The real number of infections could be four or five times higher, Wilson says. He adds that chlamydia is particularly common among those in their late teens who are reluctant to use condoms.Since 2009, gonorrhea has surged 81% to 14,947 new cases; syphilis infections have risen 34% to 1765 new cases. For both diseases, MSM account for most of the increases. Wilson says the trend is likely due to success in controlling HIV infections. Data on HIV in Australia were announced in July during the 20th International AIDS Conference held in Melbourne. As Science reported, antiretroviral HIV medications widely used in Australia substantially cut the amount of virus in those infected and may reduce the likelihood of transmitting the virus to partners. This assumption has unfortunately led to more unprotected sex among MSM. “One of the drawbacks is that HIV treatment doesn’t work against [other] STIs,” says John de Wit, a social psychologist at the Centre for Social Research in Health. “There is quite a lot of room for improvement” in getting MSM regularly and comprehensively tested for STIs and in promoting condom use, he says.     The hepatitis situation is particularly grim. The figure of 1019 people who died of hepatitis B and C last year exceeds the peak for AIDS in the 1980s. There is a long lag between the time of infection and the onset of serious illness. Wilson says that, with an estimated 440,000 people living with the viruses, the number of deaths “will get worse in years to come.”The largest culprit in the spread of hepatitis is dirty needles for injecting drugs, with such risky behavior more prominent among younger people and MSM. One national survey found that more than 40% of MSM injecting drugs reused or passed on used injection paraphernalia despite the country’s needle and syringe exchange programs. “It’s time to strengthen hepatitis prevention through awareness raising and education,” de Wit says.Government restrictions on eligibility have limited the availability of hepatitis treatments, Wilson says. There’s also “the massive stigma that pervades society around people who inject drugs,” de Wit says.The one bit of good news is that human papillomavirus (HPV) infections have dropped dramatically since a vaccination program for high school students began in 2007. Before the program, more than 14% of females younger than 21 who received sexual health checks were diagnosed with genital warts, a symptom of HPV infection. That number has since dropped to 0.5%. “It’s a dramatic decrease that is all attributable to the vaccine,” Wilson says. However, except for hepatitis B there are no vaccines for the other infectious diseases covered in the survey. Australian Science Media Centre last_img read more