The Government’s Final Word on Problem Drywall

first_imgBy the time the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and its team of consultants and testers had completed their investigation of problem drywall imported from China during the building boom, the agency had heard complaints about the drywall from 3,905 homeowners in 42 states, the District of Columbia, American Samoa, and Puerto Rico.The complaints focused on the drywall’s alleged off-gassing of compounds that, homeowners said, caused health problems, including respiratory ailments and headaches, and caused corrosion of metal components in the homes. Many people said the drywall also emitted a sulfurous rotten-egg odor that rendered their homes almost uninhabitable. The CPSC estimates that as many as 6,300 homes are afflicted with the problem product.A final guidance for homeowners, based on a study of 51 homes (41 “complaint” homes and 10 non-complaint homes) and issued by the CPSC on September 15, recommended a few relatively modest actions beyond the obvious – and, in many instances, financially impractical – step of replacing the drywall: (1) replacement of all smoke and carbon monoxide alarms; (2) replacement of electrical distribution components, including receptacles, switches, and circuit breakers (but not necessarily wiring); and (3) replacement of fusible-type fire sprinkler heads.No extensive research on possible long-term health problemsOne striking thing about the CPSC investigation is that it never extensively researched homeowners’ claims of health problems related to the drywall. As noted in the CPSC summary released this month, the agency “requested that CDC (U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) consider undertaking a comprehensive study of any possible long-term health effects. In February 2011, CDC indicated that the best scientific evidence available at that time did not support undertaking a long-term health study.”An FAQ on the CPSC website acknowledges homeowners’ complaints about health problems, but also notes that because “many consumers report that their symptoms lessen or go away when they are away from their home, but return upon re-entry, it appears that these symptoms are short-term and related to something within the home.”“The staffs of the CPSC and CDC,” the FAQ continues, “agree that the levels of sulfur gases detected in the affected homes in the 51-home study were at concentrations below the known irritant levels in the available scientific literature; however, it is possible that the additive or synergistic effects of these and other compounds in the subject homes could potentially cause irritant effects to consumers.”Hydrogen sulfide and the humidity factorWhatever health problems the off-gassed compounds might or might not have caused, they did in fact corrode more metal surfaces (particularly copper and silver) in the study’s complaint homes than in the non-complaint homes, researchers under the CPSC purview found. Concentrations of hydrogen sulfide were significantly higher in complaint homes, for example, and hydrogen sulfide concentrations in the air were associated with higher dew points for homes with imported drywall. “Hydrogen sulfide was present where the dew point reached typical room temperatures and condensation of water vapor would be expected,” a study summary noted.In addition, the study showed that while hydrogen sulfide and formaldehyde concentrations in indoor air were associated with corrosion rates in the study homes, concentrations of aldehydes in the indoor air of both complaint and non-complaint homes did not differ significantly.One positive outcome of all this is that the researchers involved now have ways to identify problematic drywall using a combination of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. The CPSC also noted that it continues to work with industry standards groups to develop better standards for drywall, and that ASTM International is pushing for a requirement that all drywall sheets be stamped with the manufacturer’s name, the production date, and the source materials.last_img read more

300 Muslim students to get scholarships on PM’s birthday

first_imgA total of 300 economically backward Muslim students would be awarded the Narendra Modi Scholarship on the Prime Minister’s 67th birthday on September 17, the Forum for Muslim Studies and Analysis (FMSA) announced on Tuesday.The scholarship was constituted by the FMSA, an Aligarh-based group of Muslim intellectuals, in May last year.EmpowermentJasim Mohammad, the director of the FMSA, said: “The Prime Minister is concerned about the problems of the minority community. I constituted the scholarship in his name because it will empower the minority community educationally. Once empowered, these students will make our country proud.”Last year, a total of 100 students were awarded the scholarship of ₹5,000. But, given the enthusiastic response it received, the FMSA decided to increase the number of beneficiaries to 300.Forms available online“Last year, more than 22,000 Muslim students had applied for the scholarship, 16,000 of whom were girls. It only showed the extent of desire among Muslims to study. So, we decided to modify the scholarship amount to ₹3,000 and increase the number of beneficiaries to 300,” said Mr. Mohammad.He added that the aim of the scholarship was to “carry forward the commitment of the Prime Minister to Sab Ka Saath, Sab Ka Vikas”.Last dateThe form for the scholarship has been uploaded on www.jasim.org. Students of classes XI, XII, graduation and post-graduation are eligible to apply. The last date for submitting the form is September 10.Mr. Mohammad shot to the limelight when he wrote the first-ever biography of the Prime Minister, titled Narendra Bhai Modi — Farsh Se Arsh Tak, in Urdu. The first volume of the proposed five-volume biography was launched by Mr. Modi on May 10 last year.last_img read more

ICC World Cup 2011 countdown begins

first_imgSouth African cricket players, Morne Morkel, left, and Dale Steyn pose with the ICC Cricket World Cup Trophy in the Dubai Aquarium & Under Water Zoo to mark the 100-day countdown to the opening ceremony for the Cricket World Cup 2011, Dubai, UAE, Tuesday November 09, 2010.The 100-day countdown for the 2011 ICC Cricket World Cup began in Dubai on Tuesday. The trophy for the tenth edition of cricket World Cup was displayed by South African players Morne Morkel and Dale Steyn at the Dubai Aquarium. The South African and Pakistani teams after concluded their five-ODI series in Dubai on Monday joined fast bowlers Morkel and Steyn as the duo unveiled the trophy. The trophy for World Cup 2011 was launched in a rather innovative manner. Steyn and Morkel went underwater to unveil the coveted trophy amidst sharks and other sea creatures at the aquarium. Talking to media at the ceremony, International Cricket Council (ICC) chief executive Haroon Lorgat said, “It was spectacular to watch the 100-day countdown ceremony and the ICC and the three host countries are gearing up for the World Cup.” The 43-day tournament will be jointly hosted by India, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh. The opening ceremony of the World Cup will be held in Bangladesh capital Dhaka on February 17 and the first will be played two days later. The final match will be held in Mumbai on April 2.last_img read more