Nigerian artist wins prestigious South African art prize

first_imgPeju Alatise is the 2017 winner of the FNB Art Prize. The Nigerian mixed-medium artist explores strong African narratives with a focus on the experiences of contemporary African women.Peju Alatise’s mixed-medium installation Flying Girls was exhibited at the Venice Biennale in June 2017. (Image: Peju Alatise)CD AndersonAlatise’s various early paintings, later sculptures and current installations will be the showcase exhibit at the tenth annual FNB Joburg Art Fair, to be held in Sandton from 8-10 September 2017.The fair, one of South Africa’s leading art events, will feature more than 60 exhibitions across five categories, including traditional and modern art. Artists and cultural organisations from 11 countries, including the United States, will be part of the event.Alatise’s work was nominated for the award by Johannesburg’s Red Door Gallery. Gallery founder Bola Asiru felt that her work best communicated both the African and female experience. “Peju’s work is filled with strong societal narratives on the realities of life in Africa,” Asiru said.Born in 1975 in Lagos, Nigeria, Alatise studied architecture before being inspired by the jarring and honest visual art of fellow Nigerian artist David Dale. She later trained with Dale, as well as worked with traditional artisans around Africa, learning to incorporate materials such as beads, cloth and natural resins into her increasingly ambitious works.Alatise has exhibited around the world, including at the Smithsonian Institute of African Art in the US and the Venice Biennale in Italy, one of the world’s longest running and most respected art events. Her earlier paintings and more recent multimedia pieces are also in a number of private collections as well as permanent exhibits around the world.“It’s time for [her] message to be taken to the rest of Africa and there is no better platform for this than the FNB Joburg Art Fair,” Asiru said.“[The Biennale is the] highest level of exhibiting an artist can be honoured with,” Alatise told CNN earlier this year. “It is the Olympics of the arts.” The particular work exhibited in Venice, titled Flying Girls, is an eight-sculpture installation of winged girls in mid-flight, representing “a strong societal narrative on the realities faced by women in Africa”. The piece will on show at the Joburg Art Fair.Peju Alatise’s mixed-medium installation Flying Girls was exhibited at the Venice Biennale in June 2017. (Image: Peju Alatise)Announcing her win on its website, the Art Fair describes Alatise’s work as “installations using materials such as cloth, beads, wood, cement and resin. Addressing several social, political and gender-related issues as her primary subject matter, her works have also captured the joys and pain of womanhood as experienced in modern-life-African traditions, with all their consequences. Her subject matter has evolved with her continued experiences, moving her focus from advocating the equal rights of women to broader political and philosophical issues.”Speaking about Alatise’s winning contribution to the Joburg Art Fair, jury member Pulane Kingston from Webber Wentzel Attorneys said the judges were unanimous. “The quality of all shortlisted candidate proposals was high this year, but… Peju Alatise’s proposal… stood out. The innovative, universal social relevance and poignancy in the themes underpinning her work were some of the deciding factors in tipping the scales in her favour.“The body of her work over the years has been varied and compositionally strong and we think that it palpably reflects the intense vibrancy of the African continent. We have no doubt that the integrity of the overall body of her work will propel her career meaningfully.”As sponsor of the award and the event, Aneesa Razack, CEO of FNB Share Investing, said Alatise’s work was a fine representation of the bank’s commitment to art in Africa. “We recognise that artistic expression involves creativity and imagination, which we know to be key drivers of innovation… the social and political commentary of Alatise’s work embodies so much of what we hope to find in the recipient of the prize.”Read an indepth interview with Peju Alatise by Aljazeera here. For more information about the Joburg Art Fair, visit the website here. View more of Peju Alatise’s work on her personal website here. Source: All Africa, FNB, Joburg Art FairWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

EU vote on opt-out proposal a positive for biotech

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The American Soybean Association (ASA) welcomes news of the European Parliament’s overwhelming rejection of a proposal that would allow individual European Union (EU) member states to opt-out of importing and using foods containing biotechnology for non-scientific reasons. The body voted 619-58 to approve a committee report recommending opposition to the controversial “opt-out” proposal.“This is a much-needed action today by the European Parliament. ASA has repeatedly called on the EU to make science-based decisions on the issue of biotechnology, and we are very happy to see the Europeans do so this morning. One of the unifying principles of the EU is to provide a single market, both within Europe and as a partner in in global commerce.  Enabling each of its 28 member states to go rogue on GMO acceptance, based on societal or political concerns, is hardly a unifying strategy for success,” said Wade Cowan, ASA president. “Soybean farmers welcome today’s news as we look to expand our European markets for animal feed, edible oils, biodiesel and biobased products. Europe is a top-five market for American soybeans, and we looking forward to further expanding our trade relationship. Moving forward, the Commission has been directed by the EU Parliament to come up with a new proposal. However, in our view, it would be more appropriate for the EU to use its own existing procedures to approve new biotech products rather than trying to come up with another approach. The Commission just needs to do its job by following its own regulations and procedures.”last_img read more

ICC World Cup 2011 countdown begins

first_imgSouth African cricket players, Morne Morkel, left, and Dale Steyn pose with the ICC Cricket World Cup Trophy in the Dubai Aquarium & Under Water Zoo to mark the 100-day countdown to the opening ceremony for the Cricket World Cup 2011, Dubai, UAE, Tuesday November 09, 2010.The 100-day countdown for the 2011 ICC Cricket World Cup began in Dubai on Tuesday. The trophy for the tenth edition of cricket World Cup was displayed by South African players Morne Morkel and Dale Steyn at the Dubai Aquarium. The South African and Pakistani teams after concluded their five-ODI series in Dubai on Monday joined fast bowlers Morkel and Steyn as the duo unveiled the trophy. The trophy for World Cup 2011 was launched in a rather innovative manner. Steyn and Morkel went underwater to unveil the coveted trophy amidst sharks and other sea creatures at the aquarium. Talking to media at the ceremony, International Cricket Council (ICC) chief executive Haroon Lorgat said, “It was spectacular to watch the 100-day countdown ceremony and the ICC and the three host countries are gearing up for the World Cup.” The 43-day tournament will be jointly hosted by India, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh. The opening ceremony of the World Cup will be held in Bangladesh capital Dhaka on February 17 and the first will be played two days later. The final match will be held in Mumbai on April 2.last_img read more