The library of the British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge

first_imgThe history of the British Antarctic Survey, and of its predecessors, Operation Tabarin and Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, is outlined. The objectives, stock, and organization of the Survey’s library and the services provided are described. In addition to the main library at its headquarters in Cambridge, the Survey maintains small scientific libraries on each of its five bases. The problems of remote information provision are discussed.last_img

Speech: Housing Minister’s speech at the Design Quality Conference 2018

first_imgIntroductionWell good morning, can I welcome you all to this conference, the first on design quality we’ve hosted as a Ministry.I’d like to thank my team of officials for all their hard-work and creativity in making today happen.Of course, we couldn’t have done it without our sponsors, so a huge thanks, and I want to name them as we are very grateful, to:Nigel Longstaff from BarrattTony Pidgley from Berkeley HomesAdrian Penfold from British LandMelanie Leech from BPFHelen Gordon from GraingerRosie Toogood from Legal and General Modular HomesDan Labbad from Lend Leaseand, Mary Parsons from Places for People.And thanks to all of you for coming today.Just over a month ago, the Prime Minister stood here in this room and launched our ambitious planning reform package to help us deliver the homes our country so sorely needs.It’s a commitment that we’re already delivering on, with over 217,000 new homes delivered in the last year,And over a million homes delivered since 2010.We’ve helped thousands of people onto the housing ladder, through Help to Buy and the recent cut in stamp duty for first time buyers.And are making renting fairer, safer and more secure for tenants.But it’s also become clear to me in the short time that I have been in this job, that it’s not good enough just to build more homes.We need to build better homes.Homes that embody the high standards of quality and design, that are at the heart of strong communities…And that is what today’s conference is really all about for us,Championing the great work that many of you doing … to create attractive, thriving, places to live …And ensuring that, whether you are a home-owner or a renter, quality design is available to everyone,That it becomes the norm, rather than some exception.UK as global leadersWhenever I discuss the role of design in home-building, I can’t help feeling that the objective, the aim of building homes on the scale we need in this this country,And at the same time making them wonderful, vibrant places to live,Should be seen as mutually reinforcing goals … not competing priorities.Steve Jobs once said: Design is a funny word.Some people think design means how it looks.But of course, if you dig deeper, it’s really about how it works. And if that’s true of your phone it must be even more important when it comes to your home.How our homes feel, how they look it is not some ‘nice tack-on’ if you like, an additional extra,It is inextricably interwoven with how they function in practice and how we feel about them,And how our individual homes fit in with our neighbourhoods and wider community.So design really matters, it’s a practical thing it’s not just abstract.It lies at the heart and soul of the housing challenge.And I was excited to open this conference,Because I know from all the innovative talent we have got in this room, That we’ve got a really strong foundation to build on.That flows from the history we have got in this country and we have a long history as world leaders in architecture and urban design … But also having and forging new innovative ways of looking at housing design for the future.The calibre of entrants to the Housing Design Awards, which celebrates its 70th anniversary this year, is a testament to that … And there are the many excellent examples of housing being delivered across the country, By Housing Associations, by councils, by developers,And through the growing Build to Rent market.I recently visited Heyford Park in Oxfordshire.It’s a good illustration of the strides we are making.It really feels like a community,From the moment you stroll past the new local school, Around the well-designed streets … in a beautiful setting, Underpinned by well-planned transport links, so it really feels like it is set-up to thrive for the future.We should take great pride in our design heritage and feel inspired by it … as we gear up to deliver those 300,000 homes that we will need by the middle of the next decade to meet the demand in this country. 300,000 each year.It’s going to be a real challenge,A lot of opportunities for all of you to hone and fine-tune your design skills along the way, So we build the homes we need, The homes people fall in love with, And the homes that communities welcome, There’s no question it’s a great challenge.But I think, and I sense from people in the room that I have already talked to, that there is many of us that actually out of this challenge we can really find a great opportunity.And, if we are going to seize that opportunity and meet the challenge, it is clear to me that quality matters.And just as innovation in smart phones has emancipated hundreds of millions through better technology, better information, better communication links.So too, high quality design in housing shouldn’t just be the preserve of those with deep pockets,But within the grasp of everyone in this country who dreams of moving into their own place, whether it is to rent or to buy.First time buyers and social housingTake first time buyers. They are investing a huge amount of money, They are toiling harder than ever to get a foot on the housing ladder. I think it’s right they expect a beautiful home, a beautifully designed home, in return, Whether it’s a studio right they way through to a larger family house.Lower incomes should not mean low grade quality.That’s something that has really been brought into a sharper focus for me,Dealing with the situation in the aftermath of the horrific events at Grenfell and the work we’re doing, which is a part of that, on the forthcoming Social Housing Green Paper.We’ve just completed a national programme of meetings with social housing tenants, we’ve been taking wider views online and we have been able to listen and share views with all of those people who live and breath the life as social housing tenants.Many spoke to me believe it or not, you might not intuitively expect it, but many spoke to me about the pride they take in their homes, But they also talked right across the country, from Basingstoke to North Kensington, they also spoke to me about some of the stigma associated with social housing.I am convinced that design has a role to play, in inspiring the way social tenants feel about their homes,And piercing some of frankly pretty offensive stereotypes people perceive about those communities.For everyone in this country, the way our homes look and how they make us feel is central to our quality of life,Essential for the vibrant and resilient communities we want to build.Now I know it sounds a bit soft and fluffy but there’s hard evidence to back up this concept.How design quality affects supplyDesign quality has an important role to play in boosting supply. It is not just about quality, but it is interlinked with the number homes we build,Looking at good practice from some of our large-scale developments demonstrates that taking a long-term view,Making sure that you have got great design, Along with the right targeted infrastructure investment, Delivers more of the places where people really want to live, And can also help in the process reduce some of the local opposition we have historically seen in this country.Let’s face it, the more attractive the new homes are, The more likely we are to carry communities with us,And the less pressure there will be on local authorities to oppose residential development.That’s got to be the win-win we’re striving for in this room.I have got no doubt that a focus on quality can drive up the quantity of new homes delivered.We can see that from the fine examples of developments being built using modern methods of construction, Whether it’s Kidbrooke Village in Greenwich or Smiths Dock in North Shields.And nor should high quality design necessarily cost more.That’s one of the key points that we need to demonstrate through research as government, and you need to demonstrate in your practice in terms of rolling out and deploying modern methods of construction.Impact on social factorsGood design can help us deliver more homes more swiftly, that’s important too. And it can also improve people’s health and wellbeing.According to Public Health England, high-density living along with good community facilities is associated with increasing positive social interaction. Again that is another illustration if you like of the way smart design can deliver a win-win.Of course, proximity to outside spaces matters too – particularly in the context of density. And our parks and green spaces, there is no doubt, the evidence is clear, helping increase health, fitness and mental wellbeing as well.So raising the bar on design can help tackle wider issues and indeed it can help tackle wider social issues too. The regeneration of Coventry’s Spirit Quarter saw crime in the area going down, and at the same time the percentage of students leaving school with five or more GCSE grades A* to C go up.Government actionSo those are just some of the reasons why this conference is so valuable,For promoting better community engagement, innovation and learning from best practice elsewhere.Much of the work will be done by the techies – the architects, the developers, the engineers and the local planners.But it’s clear to me the government has a role to play as well. We are putting high quality design at the very heart of what we are doing and it is central really to the mission we’ve got to get Britain building.It starts with our planning reforms, which include the revised National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF). I’m sure you have all had a chance to have a look at and study in great detail.The revised NPPF strengthens the focus on high-quality design.The framework places a renewed emphasis on achieving well-designed places by setting out that new development should add to the overall quality and quality of life of an area, And that permission should be refused if there is poor design – that is a really important step.Community engagementWe want to see development guided by what people want locally, Not some dull homogenous, design that has been pulled out of a bureaucratic top drawer in an office miles away from the community where the people affected are actually going to live it.The NPPF promotes early engagement with the community and promotes the use of tools and techniques, using IT an other things, to asses design quality.Through the revised NPPF, there will be fewer opportunities for local authorities to lower the expectations or to fail to deliver on the expectations and indeed on their plans.We can see already how this approach will add value, for example in the Garden Settlements programme.Take Tresham. People from the local area attended workshops to help develop the strategic masterplan, so that was a really important example of where the community were involved from the outset,Or Didcot Garden Town, there was an interactive website to encourage more people to get involved in shaping the community as it developed.And I think in the same spirit, if you look at the programme on Neighbourhood Plans they will go a long way to increasing the amount of influence the local community has on well-designed development, We have got 560 plans that have been signed off, over 2,400 groups starting have been starting the neighbourhood planning process since 2012. So that is something that is really gathering momentum.And I am excited by the sector-led initiatives as well, initiatives like Beauty in my Back Yard, Which is a great way of harnessing IT to help communities participate effectively in local planning,So that good design gets off the drawing board and gets onto the building site.Innovation and international practiceAs with Beauty in my Backyard, innovation is crucial to creative design, And I feel that the SMEs in this sector, the new entrants the challengers in the market are often strong drivers of greater creativity and innovation in this area.So, I am quite keen to learn, as well as the market leaders in the field, … and, I should add, not just those the UK, I think we have got a lot to learn from some of the innovative practice abroad.Many Northern European countries, including Denmark, Sweden and Norway have interesting national policy framework to encourage high quality design in home-building.I can see in my own community some of the Scandinavian designs are really popular.Beyond Europe, in Australia they uphold good design through clear guidance on expected quality of neighbourhoods and homes.Last year the Better Placed policy was launched in New South Wales in Australia. It aligns, it is quite similar with our view that design is not just what a place look like, but also how it works and feels to the people already living in it.So in central park in Sydney, they matched higher density with social areas for people to share a meal, to meet or just to mingle.And, here at home, we’re promoting innovation by encouraging market diversification, particularly through the Home Building Fund.So far 11 schemes, all employing modern methods of construction, have been awarded nearly £1 billion of funding to deliver innovation.One of these is Crowthorne in Berkshire, where the delivery of over 1,000 homes has been accelerated using modular methods of construction.I hope that all the SMEs invited here today, along with the larger developers, will be pioneers, really blazing the trail in this area, in delivering the most attractively designed homes for our communities.Good practiceAnd of course I have to mention our new, more assertive housing agency, Homes England because Nick Walkley and his team will be at the heart of our efforts. He has got an excellent team at Homes England and they have got a huge opportunity I think to deliver on our aspirations on better design of new garden settlements, Backed up by £22 million pounds worth of capacity funding for local authorities leading these projects to boost their capabilities …. And that includes getting the design right.These garden towns and villages amount to 24 new locally-led communities, with the potential to deliver over 220,000 new homes. It’s a really big slug of supply that goes with the quality we want to see.Supporting local authoritiesLocal councils too, they are an essential vehicle for delivering better design too and that is what our NPPF revisions are all about.Many local authorities told us they really buy into this, they share our ambition for setting high standards of design, but they did say they needed a bit of support in order to realise those aspirations.We listened to that feedback.And we launched the Planning Delivery Fund last year and awarded 26 local authorities over £5 million to boost their resources and deliver increased design quality in their areas.The bids focused on resource to develop masterplans and to accelerate housing delivery … another illustration of the win-win we want to achieve between quality and quantity of the homes.ConclusionSo, with your help, high quality design is well and truly on the map,It is central to our vision of how we can build the homes Britain needs,Whilst carrying local communities with us,And reviving that dream of home ownership we want to see for the next generation.This conference today is an important milestone along that journey, it’s not the point of arrival, but the point of departure.And it is really an opportunity to showcase your talents,To look at brilliant examples of inspirational design, both in this country and also across the world,And to link up the innovation and creativity of the private sector,With the linchpin roles councils and, of course, government have to play as well.Above all, I wanted to take the time out to open the conference really just to demonstrate to all of you that you have a government that is really serious … About delivering not just the number of homes that we need in this country, But also the kinds of homes that families dream of.Thank you all very much.last_img read more

Allied Bakeries appoints Liam McNamara as sales director

first_imgAllied Bakeries has recruited Liam McNamara as the company’s new sales director – leaving his role as managing director at tea business Twinings.McNamara joined Twinings in 2014 and has also been a managing director for Mars’ operations in Ireland and Greece.Jon Jenkins, managing director of Allied Bakeries, said McNamara brings a depth of valuable commercial and general management experience to Allied Bakeries.“I am delighted he is joining our board. The UK bakery category is worth over £3bn, and the ‘wrapped bakery’ fixture is the single most shopped aisle in grocery retail, presenting a fantastic opportunity for future growth,” he said.“Liam’s strong commercial background, coupled with his excellent management experience, will help add value to the category as we go into a new and exciting phase of brand development to secure future growth.”Earlier this month, Allied Bakeries unveiled the new-look Allinson brand and have plans to transform the packaged bakery market.last_img read more

Tiny homes for a big problem

first_imgYana Serry (left) a recent graduate from Wesleyan University, mentors Mt. Abram student Madison Contreras in her t-shirt business.FARMINGTON – A pilot program initiated by the Center for Entrepreneurial Studies aims to address issues of homelessness in the region; the program was recently awarded a $20,000 Affordable Housing Challenge Grant to help kick off the initiative.The grant was made possible through the LEAP Explosion Fund which is organized by the United Way of the Tri-Valley Area. A small committee of community members have overseen the grant process, including reviewing and selecting applicants. Grantees will be required to submit six-month reports to the committee.“We are conscious that our support is just a small piece of this project, but we hope it helps to jump start the opportunities that CES can bring,” UWTVA Executive Director Lisa Laflin said.The project, one of many that CES works on, is a proposed village of tiny houses that will provide shelter for homeless youth, veterans, elderly and single parents in the area. CES founder Bonita Lehigh said they plan to initially focus on homeless youth in the area, which falls in line with the non-profit’s motto of “by students for students”. CES was founded in 2018 by Lehigh and a group of students from her former Business Management class at Mt. Blue High School. Last summer, the cooperative opened a student-run storefront on Main Street where teens have the opportunity to learn business management firsthand, as well as test out entrepreneurial initiatives.“We’ve just charged forward with this, with the hopes that people will see it and step up,” Lehigh said.Lehigh has been working toward purchasing a parcel of land on Route 2 that could serve as the landing site for the tiny homes. Initially CES will purchase two tiny homes on wheels, that can house homeless teens. Once stable, the student would have the option of buying the tiny home, which would then allow CES to purchase another one. Along with shelter, CES would assist the student in setting up other crucial supports, such as mental health needs.“For it to work, it has to attend to all of their needs. You can’t just drop a young person into housing and walk away,” Executive Director of New Beginnings Chris Bicknell said. “It could work. You just have to provide support of services.”Tiny houses for the homeless is not an entirely new concept. Other organizations and municipalities across the country have created similar “villages” to help ease the alarming numbers of homeless people- according to US Dept. of Housing and Urban Development, 567,715 people are homeless on any given night, a 12 percent increase since 2007.But some people see tiny house villages as a band aid to the real issue, and a demeaning band aid at that.“…the tiny house villages we’re seeing today are the descendants of Depression-era shanty towns that sprung up in American cities….right now, tiny houses are the best thing that we can do for homeless people….even today, decades after the Depression, America still doesn’t think of housing as a human right,” Miles Howard writes. Locally, in rural Maine, Lehigh describes the project as a “massive one” and one that will require community support and buy in.“There needs to be more awareness of the issues plaguing these kids. We have an obligation, as a community, to take care of them,” she said.Franklin County does not have a YMCA, or a Boys & Girls Club, Lehigh pointed out, and the area’s only homeless shelter was forced to close its doors this summer.Lehigh is familiar with resistance to the project, and even to her personally, but naysayers aside, she said she’s determined to find the rest of the money for the project.“We’ve gotten some validation now, and with this funding, we’re ready to fly. People are coming out of the woodwork to help,” she said.For more information about CES and the Tiny House Project, contact Bonita Lehigh at [email protected]last_img read more

Phish Shares Pro-Shot Video Of Tender “Mountains In The Mist” From Hampton Night One [Watch]

first_imgA few days—and a couple more shows—removed from last weekend’s Phish run at Hampton Coliseum, fans are still buzzing about the magic that occurred over three nights at one of the most beloved venues in the band’s history. The weekend was filled with rare bust-outs and covers, thrilling jams (hot damn, that “Simple”), and the kind of band and audience energy you only find at a place as special as The Mothership.However, the beauty of Phish’s Hampton run extended past the more buzzworthy moments and seeped into virtually everything the band played. Case in point: the gorgeous rendition of “Mountains in the Mist” in the heart of set two on Friday night, 10/19/18. Dropped in the middle of two top-notch segued segments (“Carini” > “Sand” > a dark and dirty “Golden Age” before it; “Meatstick” > “Split Open And Melt” in its wake), this Trey Anastasio/Tom Marshall balled was placed perfectly and shined brightly in its own right. While Phish is certainly not a band most well-known for its ballads, this “Mountains in the Mist” showcased the band’s depth of ability, as the tender, emotive performances by each of the band’s members—Trey in particular—translated into a thoroughly heart-warming second set breather.You can check out pro-shot footage of Phish’s “Mountains in the Mist” from Hampton night one below, courtesy of LivePhish:Phish – “Mountains in the Mist”[Video: Phish]Phish’s fall tour continues on Friday with the band’s first of three nights at Allstate Arena in Rosemont, IL before closing with a four-night Halloween run in Las Vegas next week. For more information, head to Phish’s website.Setlist: Phish | Hampton Coliseum | Hampton, VA | 10/19/18Set One: Llama[1], Fuego > Runaway Jim, Bug > Mound, Tela > 46 Days, FluffheadSet Two: First Tube > Tweezer > Dirt > Backwards Down the Number Line > No Men In No Man’s Land > Cavern > Gotta Jibboo > The Oh Kee Pa Ceremony > Suzy GreenbergEncore: Shine a Light[1] Performed in a slow funk stylelast_img read more

Clubs host career panel featuring alumnae

first_imgNotre Dames Club and ND Women Connect will co-host a Campus to Career panel discussion and networking event featuring six Notre Dame alumnae in the Morris Inn Ballroom on Friday afternoon.Senior Alison Leddy, founder and president of Notre Dames, said the event will help the club promote its mission by providing women on campus with opportunities that could prove beneficial to their future careers.“The mission of Notre Dames is to strengthen the female voice on campus and to bring awareness to issues that affect women at Notre Dame, across the country and around the world,” Leddy said.According to its website, ND Women Connect works to create alumnae outreach programs and increase graduate involvement among the female population at Notre Dame.“We are really excited to co-sponsor this event with ND Women Connect,” Leddy said. “They are an affinity group within the alumni association that is inclusive of everyone, but female-focused, very similar to the Notre Dames.“[ND Connect is] trying to increase its visibility and presence on campus, so that you don’t have to wait until after you graduate to hear about them. They’re a really great way to connect Notre Dame women in all different cities.”The Campus to Career event aims to encourage networking among Notre Dame women, both here on campus and throughout the country, Leddy said. It will consist of a panel and an informal networking session with alumnae.According to the Campus to Career event page, six Notre Dame alumnae will attend the event: Joya De Foor (’77), Elizabeth Tavitas (’85), Eleanor Kuhns (’88), Sheila Delaney (’99), Monica Zigman (’06) and Kaitlin Sullivan (’10).Leddy said both Notre Dames and ND Women Connect recognize there is power in bringing women together.“You can find inspiration in a lot of places, and I think inspiration can be incredibly meaningful if it’s from someone who comes from a similar background to you,” Leddy said. “That’s why I love having strong, female role models, and I think the Notre Dame alumnae are a perfect example of that.”Leddy said she hopes both the alumnae and current students form natural and organic relationships based around experiences they share.“It can be something as informal as ‘Let’s talk about our mutual experience of living in Cavanaugh,’ for example,” Leddy said. “I hope that these initial conversations will foster more long lasting mentoring relationships.”The event is a good opportunity for older students starting to think about what steps to take after college, Leddy said.“We’re going to touch on each panelist’s professional experience, but we’re also going to be able to ask questions and to talk about how they balance work and family life and if they have suggestions and reassurance for graduating seniors who might be panicked about the job search,” she said.Leddy also said she highly encourages underclassmen to attend the networking event.“I think it’s especially perfect for underclassmen who might have been intimidated to go to the internship fair,” she said. “It’s a great opportunity for them to work on those skills needed to talk to potential recruiters … and to get very tangible advice about pursuing your professional goals.”Leddy said she hopes the Campus to Career event will give students the opportunity to ask alumnae questions relevant to their own futures.“What’s great about Notre Dame alumni, in general, is that they’re always interested in what’s going on on campus, they really care and they want to get to know students. So this is a great way to make that connection,” Leddy said.Tags: Campus to Career, ND women connect, Notre Dameslast_img read more

Holy Cross announces plans for fall semester

first_imgIn a Monday email to the College community, Holy Cross President Fr. David Tyson announced plans for reopening campus for the fall semester. The semester will begin the week of August 10 and have no fall break in order to end prior to Thanksgiving.Following consultation with experts including public health officials and contagious disease specialists, the College began creating a plan to safely return to campus for the fall semester.“For us to safely open for the fall semester we must be prepared to prevent the spread of the virus by identifying those returning students who are infected with the virus,” Tyson said in the email. “We will need to implement a comprehensive testing protocol, a capacity to isolate those who present positive test results as well as provide a quarantine for students who have been in contact with them.”Tyson said the College plans to develop additional safety measures, including protocols for faculty and staff. A handbook of the protocols will be created and made available to the Holy Cross community.“Presently, all classes are scheduled to be conducted in a synchronous environment with students and professors present to one another,” Tyson said. “However, if in the event that a new outbreak should occur, we need to be prepared to adapt to these circumstances.”These adaptations could come in the form of continuing remote learning if students are kept home at the beginning of the semester or sent home once the semester has begun.“Though it is an ominous challenge, we believe that we can meet it with the cooperation and collaboration of all of us in the Holy Cross community,” Tyson said.Tags: 2020 fall semester, COVID-19, Holy Cross Collegelast_img read more

Proposed amendments to jury instructions

first_img December 1, 2005 reason of insanity Regular News Proposed amendments to jury instructions The Supreme Court Committee on Standard Jury Instructions in Criminal Cases has submitted to the Florida Supreme Court a report proposing revisions to the Florida Standard Jury Instructions in Criminal Cases. The Committee proposes revisions to Instruction 3.6(a) – Insanity, Instruction 3.6(b) – Hallucinations, and Instruction 3.6(d) – Voluntary Intoxication. The court invites all interested persons to comment on the committee’s proposals, which are reproduced in full below, as well as online at www.floridasupremecourt.org/decisions/proposed.shtml. An original and nine paper copies of all comments must be filed with the Court on or before January 3, 2006, with a certificate of service verifying that a copy has been served on Judge Dedee S. Costello, committee chair, Bay County Courthouse, P.O. Box 1089, Panama City 32402-1089, as well as a separate request for oral argument if the person filing the comment wishes to participate in oral argument, which may be scheduled in this case. Electronic copies of all comments also must be filed in accordance with the Court’s Administrative Order In Re: Mandatory Submission of Electronic Copies of Documents, Fla. Admin. Order No. AOSC04-84 (Sept. 13, 2004). IN THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA IN RE: STANDARD JURY INSTRUCTIONS IN CRIMINAL CASES (NO. 2005-5), CASE NO. SC05-1622 Proposal 1 3.6(a) INSANITY An issue in this case is whether (defendant) was insane when the crime allegedly was committed. A person is considered to be insane when: 1. [He] [She] had a mental infirmity, disease, or defect. 2. Because of this condition a. [he] [she] did not know what [he] [she] was doing or its consequences or b. although [he] [she] knew what [he] [she] was doing and its consequences, [he] [she] did not know it was wrong. Give if applicable A defendant who believed that what [he] [she] was doing was morally right is not insane if the defendant knew that what [he] [she] was doing violated societal standards or was against the law. (See Wallace v. State 766 So.2d 364 (3rd DCA 2000). All persons are presumed to be sane. The defendant has the burden of proving the defense of insanity by clear and convincing evidence. Clear and convincing evidence is evidence that is precise, explicit, lacking in confusion, and of such weight that it produces a firm belief or conviction, without hesitation, about the matter in issue. However, if the evidence causes you to have a reasonable doubt concerning the defendant’s sanity, then the presumption of sanity vanishes and the State must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendant was sane. In determining the issue of insanity, you may consider the testimony of expert and nonexpert witnesses. The question you must answer is not whether the defendant is insane today, or has ever been insane, but whether instead simply if the defendant was insane at the time the crime allegedly was committed. Give if applicable Unrestrained passion or ungovernable temper is not insanity, even though the normal judgment of the person is be overcome by passion or temper. Give if applicable If the evidence establishes that the defendant had been adjudged insane by a court, and has not been judicially restored to legal sanity, then you should assume the defendant was insane at the time of commission of the alleged crime, unless the evidence convinces you otherwise. If you find that (defendant) committed the crime but you find by clear and convincing evidence that the defendant was insane, as I have defined that term for you, have a reasonable doubt that [he] [she] was sane at that time, then you should find [him] [her] not guilty by reason of insanity. If your verdict is that the defendant is not guilty by reason of insanity because insane , that does not necessarily mean [he] [she] will be released from custody. I must conduct further proceedings to determine if the defendant should be committed to a mental hospital, or given other outpatient treatment or released. Comment If drugs or alcohol are involved, see Cirack v. State, 201 So.2d 706 (Fla. 1967). This instruction was adopted in 1981 and was amended in 1986 , and 1994 , and 2005. Proposal 2 3.6(b) INSANITY — HALLUCINATIONS Do not give this instruction for offenses occurring after June 19, 2000. An issue in this case is whether (defendant) was insane when the crime allegedly was committed. A person is considered to be insane when: 1. The person had a mental infirmity, disease, or defect. 2. Because of this condition, the person had hallucinations or delusions which caused the person to honestly believe to be facts things that are not true or real. The guilt or innocence of a person suffering from such hallucinations or delusions is to be determined just as though the hallucinations or delusions were actual facts. If the act of the person would have been lawful had the hallucinations or delusions been the actual facts, the person is not guilty of the crime. All persons are presumed to be sane. The defendant has the burden of providing the defense of insanity by clear and convincing evidence. Clear and convincing evidence is evidence that is precise, explicit, lacking in confusion, and of such weight that it produces a firm belief or conviction, without hesitation, about the matter in issue. However, if the evidence causes you to have a reasonable doubt concerning the defendant’s sanity, then the presumption of sanity vanishes and the State must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendant was sane. In determining the issue of insanity, you may consider the testimony of expert and nonexpert witnesses. The question you must answer is not whether the defendant is insane today, or has ever been insane, but simply if the defendant was insane at the time the crime allegedly was committed. Give if applicable Unrestrained passion or ungovernable temper is not insanity, even though the normal judgment of the person be overcome by passion or temper. Give if applicable If the evidence establishes that the defendant had been adjudged insane by a court, and has not been judicially restored to legal sanity, then you should assume the defendant was insane at the time of commission of the alleged crime, unless the evidence convinces you otherwise. If you find that (defendant) committed the crime but you find by clear and convincing evidence that the defendant was insane, as I have defined that term for you have a reasonable doubt that [he] [she] was sane at that time , then you should find [him] [her] not guilty by reason of insanity. If your verdict is that the defendant is not guilty by reason of insanity because insane , that does not necessarily mean [he] [she] will be released from custody. I must conduct further proceedings to determine if the defendant should be committed to a mental hospital, or given other outpatient treatment or released. Comment If voluntary intoxication is raised by the defense, see 3.6(d). This instruction was adopted July 1997 and amended 2005. Proposal 3 3.6(d) VOLUNTARY INTOXICATION Give only for offenses occurring before October 1, 1999. (See section 775.051, Florida Statutes) A defense asserted in this case is voluntary intoxication by use of [alcohol] [drugs]. The use of [alcohol] [drugs] to the extent that it merely arouses passions, diminishes perceptions, releases inhibitions, or clouds reason and judgment does not excuse the commission of a criminal act. However, where a certain mental state is an essential element of a crime, and a person was so intoxicated that [he] [she] was incapable of forming that mental state, the mental state would not exist and therefore the crime could not be committed. As I have told you, [the intent to (specific intent charged) ] [premeditated design to kill] [ (other mental state) ] is an essential element of the crime of (crime charged) . Therefore, if you find from the evidence that the defendant was so intoxicated from the voluntary use of [alcohol] [drugs] as to be incapable of forming [the intent to (specific intent charged) ] [premeditated design to kill] [ (other mental state) ], or you have a reasonable doubt about it, you should find the defendant not guilty of (crime charged) . Give when other applicable crimes are general intent crimes Voluntary intoxication is not a defense to (lesser included crimes) (crimes charged in additional counts) . Comment This instruction was adopted May 1987 and amended in 2005.center_img Proposed amendments to jury instructionslast_img read more

Lake Grove Teen Dies Falling from Tree

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Lake Grove teenager died when he fell out of a tree he was climbing during a Memorial Day Weekend party in Wading River, authorities said.Matthew Grimaldi and several others had climbed a tree in the bluffs overlooking the Long Island Sound at Hulse Landing Beach when he lost his footing and became impaled on a tree limb that punctured his chest shortly before 7 p.m. Sunday, Riverhead Town Police said.The 18-year-old victim was taken to Peconic Bay Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead.Riverhead police are continuing the investigation and ask anyone with information about this incident to call them at 631-727-4500 ext. 332.last_img

Members will love you when you offer these brilliant savings options

first_img 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Who doesn’t love to make an easy buck? There’s nothing better than feeling a little flush from time to time, especially when it requires little effort on your part. Tech savvy individuals, Millennials in particular, have making easy money down to a science. From selling goods online, using apps for automatic cash back, or surveys for free gift cards, there’s almost an art to making a little extra cash. But, wouldn’t it be great if there were more regulated ways to rack up some side cash? With creative enhancements to your credit union software, there are!Companies such as Acorns.com or Bank of America’s “Keep the Change” program have become popular, offering savings techniques that are almost effortless, rounding up your purchase and investing your spare change. However, many of these Millennials may not realize that similar technology is available right where they are already banking – at their local credit union. By maximizing core technology, financial institutions are able to offer these credit union savings solutions and benefits to members.Of Americans surveyed recently, fewer than 1 out of 5 people reported that saving money is their top financial priority. Most were merely trying to stay current with their bills, with only a handful actually working to pay down their debt. Delving further, those that were attempting to save a few dollars were of a younger subset, and potentially not as leveraged with household expenses as others. Items such as mortgages, auto loans, and family expenses often take priority, and having a savings plan can be a challenge. Creative solutions are needed (and appreciated) when it comes to saving money for a member’s rainy day fund. continue reading »last_img read more