So, why do you want to work in property?

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CABE and English Heritage set to topple Sellar’s tower

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When it all falls apart

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No end in sight for UK share plummet

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Too little, too late from EH

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Industrial: Prize possessions

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Warren ends presidential bid, leaving Biden, Sanders to fight for Democratic voters

first_imgShe vowed to continue fighting for ordinary Americans and touted the impact the campaign has already had, bringing attention to ideas such as a wealth tax and proving that candidates do not need high-dollar fund-raisers to succeed.’Vicious cycle’ on electability The vague notion of “electability,” a frequent buzzword on the campaign trail as Democrats prioritized defeating Trump over all other concerns, seemed to hurt Warren and non-white male candidates.”The general narrative was that the women might be too risky, and I think there were people who heard that enough that it started showing up in polling … and becomes a vicious cycle that was hard to break out of,” said Christina Reynolds, vice president of communications at EMILY’s List, which works to elect women favoring abortion rights and had endorsed Warren.US Representative Tulsi Gabbard remains in the race, but has repeatedly failed to win even 1% of the vote in primaries.Meanwhile, Biden and Sanders continued to step up attacks on each other following Biden’s unexpectedly strong performance on Super Tuesday earlier this week.The back-and-forth between the two contenders signaled a bruising battle to come as the race turns next to six states stretching from Mississippi to Washington state, which vote on March 10.Sanders blamed the “establishment” and corporate interests for his losses in 10 of the 14 states that voted on Tuesday, a charge Biden called “ridiculous.””You got beaten by overwhelming support I have from the African-American community, Bernie,” Biden told NBC’s “Today” show on Thursday. “You got beaten because of suburban women, Bernie. You got beaten because of the middle-class, hardworking folks out there, Bernie.”Biden received more support from black voters and women, particularly in suburban areas, exit polls found. Those two groups make up a substantial part of the Democratic electorate and were credited with delivering the party big wins during the 2018 midterm congressional elections.Biden also pointed out that Sanders has raised more campaign cash, responding to criticism that his moderate rival is collecting money from corporate interests. Aside from candidates who have self-funded their campaigns, Sanders has boasted the largest cash hauls during this election. At the end of January, Sanders had raised $134 million while Biden raised $70 million.Like Warren, Sanders has refused to hold fundraisers and instead relies on online donations. Biden, who has seen his online giving spike in recent days, regularly holds high-dollar fundraising events.In addition to Mississippi and Washington state, voters in Michigan, Missouri, and Idaho on Tuesday. North Dakota will hold caucuses. Topics : It was not clear whether Warren, who still commands a loyal base of supporters, would endorse either of her rivals.Her relationship with Sanders may have been strained in January, when she accused him of calling her a liar on national television after he denied telling her in 2018 that a woman could not beat Republican President Donald Trump.In a conference call with her campaign staff, Warren said, “Never again can anyone say that the only way that a newcomer can get a chance to be a plausible candidate is to take money from corporate executives and billionaires.”Warren swore off big donors when she launched her run and raised more than $112 million from grassroots contributions.center_img Elizabeth Warren ended her presidential campaign on Thursday, bowing to the reality that the race for the Democratic nomination has become a two-way battle between former Vice President Joe Biden and US Senator Bernie Sanders.Warren, a liberal senator who won plaudits for her command of policy details, finished well behind the two front-runners on Tuesday in 14 states, including her home state of Massachusetts, leaving her path to the nomination virtually nonexistent.Her exit makes the contest a two-man race between moderate former Vice President Joe Biden and liberal US Senator Bernie Sanders, who in many ways represent the main wings of the Democratic Party. Warren’s departure leaves what had once been the most diverse field of candidates in US history as a contest primarily between two white men with decades in office each nearing 80 years old.last_img read more

‘Drop everything, scramble’: Singapore’s contact trackers fight coronavirus

first_img“We have to drop everything, scramble and figure out where these patients have been,” said Philip, an employee of Singapore General Hospital (SGH), who wore spectacles and a bowtie.He typically tries to jog patients’ memories by asking them about their meals, all the way from breakfast to supper.”Because once they can remember who they sat down with for a meal, that would give a rough estimate of the number of people in their surroundings, and they can usually remember what they did,” Philip added.Singapore has won international praise for its painstaking onslaught on the virus, which has infected almost 135,000 people and killed more than 4,900 worldwide. Initially, it had one of the highest tallies of infections outside China, but other nations have since outpaced it.How seriously the Asian travel hub takes the virus fight was highlighted last month, when it charged a Chinese couple with giving false information about their movements to authorities looking to trace their contacts.Philip, who once had to do a patient interview at 10 p.m., usually has two hours to gather all the information he can about patients’ whereabouts, travel history and contacts in the two weeks before they come to hospital.He also relies on work calendars, diaries in Microsoft’s Excel app and receipts, as well as hospital records, to identify health workers the patients encountered.He gives the results to a health ministry team that speaks to individuals figuring in interactions, and sometimes tap police and security cameras to find those at risk.Singapore aims to gather a full picture of patients’ movements within 24 hours of confirming infections, helping to identify close contacts and quarantine them. It has quarantined 4,550 people.Even if it is tough to get ill people to recall small details, it helps to keep cheerful, says Philip, who gained his experience by tracing patient contacts for other diseases, such as measles.”You have to be very, very patient with them,” he added. “Don’t get angry, because, just like you and me, most of us can’t remember a lot of things.”Topics : After a coronavirus outbreak began to disrupt lives and activity in Singapore late in January, Conceicao Edwin Philip keeps himself ready to rush to hospital at a moment’s notice, if summoned.Philip is not a doctor or nurse, but his work, using a telephone to question patients separated from him by two glass walls, has become crucial in the Asian city-state’s fight on the virus, which has caused 187 infections in Singapore.As one of a team of contact tracers, Philip, 31, swings into action as soon as virus patients are diagnosed, to piece together the jigsaw of their prior movements and contacts.last_img read more

As world cowers, China glimpses coronavirus aftermath

first_imgTopics : Masks and temperature checks are essential to enter most places and many eateries are banning diners from facing each other in a mass “social distancing” campaign — no easy task in the world’s most populous nation.Beijing retiree Wang Huixian was among a dozen women practicing the national pastime of dancing in unison to music from portable speakers in a public park — but now with a gap of three meters between them.”During the epidemic, everyone was very tense and afraid. So we want to relax now,” said Wang, 57.But she added: “Everyone is cautious and keeping a distance from each other to avoid getting infected.” Alongside more than 3,200 deaths and over 81,000 total infections, the coronavirus outbreak has left further scars.China, the world’s second-largest economy, was shut down for weeks, with factories silent and massive cities locked down.The pain from that is expected to persist, with a surge in joblessness and many businesses gone bust. Restaurants are reopening, traffic and factories are stirring, and in one of the clearest signs yet that China is awakening from its coronavirus coma, the country’s “dancing aunties” are once again gathering in parks and squares.As the rest of the world runs for cover, China — where the virus first emerged — is moving, guardedly, in the opposite direction as domestic infections fall to nil following unprecedented lockdowns and travel restrictions.But ordinary life is far from normal. Sense of relief Most of the country is now slowly lifting restrictions and people are returning to work, unlike many Western countries where governments have ordered sweeping restrictions not seen during peacetime.Many European countries are in near-total internal lockdown, and popular tourist spots are deserted.But after weeks of empty streets and citizens sheltering at home for safety, Shanghai has transformed in recent days.Cafes and some tourist sites have reopened, and residents of China’s biggest city are re-emerging for tai chi in the park, or to take selfies along the riverfront under bright spring sunshine.”I was very scared. A sense of fear persisted,” said 50-year-old Zhang Min, the owner of an office-supply company, while strolling in a Shanghai park.”But now all is good… not like the people overseas who are engaged in panic-buying.”The flow of daily commuters into Shanghai’s financial district is picking up and some inter-provincial travel restrictions have eased.However, many provinces and cities like Shanghai now require citizens to show a downloaded QR code on their mobile phone that rates them as “green”, “yellow” or “red” — based on tracking of whether they visited a high-risk zone — before entering many businesses.”My feeling is that people with [virus] issues can’t come out, but people who can are safe, so we’re reassured,” child-care worker Lai Jinfeng, 41, said while strolling the Shanghai’s famous Bund.People shrink from an offered handshake, many restaurants have removed half their chairs to disperse customers, and other restrictions on large gatherings remain in place.And the now-ubiquitous face mask is being worked into cosmetics routines, with online beauty influencers instructing millions of women on applying make-up only to the upper half of the face, without staining the mask itself.President Xi Jinping declared during a March 10 visit to the still locked-down epicenter city of Wuhan in Hubei province that China had “turned the tide,” and a top economic official said Tuesday that 90 percent of businesses outside Hubei were operating again.But as China emerges from the worst of the virus on its soil, the costs of the pandemic will become clearer in the coming weeks and months, analysts say.”Basically before the epidemic, last year, my business was very good, but not now,” said Cai Qizhen, 52, who runs a small cobbler’s shop in Shanghai.”Now basically I don’t come in the morning… and I’m finished by 3 pm with nothing left to do.”last_img read more

COVID-19: Govt to convert more towers in athletes village for makeshift hospital

first_imgThe Public Works and Housing Ministry is set to convert three more apartment towers in the athletes village in Kemayoran, Central Jakarta into makeshift hospital buildings for COVID-19 patients to accommodate a surge in confirmed cases in the capital city.“The ministry will prepare and renovate three additional towers – towers 2, 4 and 5 – in the Kemayoran athletes village as an emergency COVID-19 hospital,” said Khalawi Abdul Hamid, the ministry’s housing provision director general, in a statement on Wednesday.Khalawi said the second phase of the makeshift hospital construction was expected to increase bed capacity and provide better accommodation for staff members – including doctors and nurses – who worked around the clock to provide treatment for COVID-19 patients. Tower 2, which consists of 886 apartments, will be used to house a maximum of 2,458 health workers.Meanwhile, towers 4 and 5 will house treatment wards for COVID-19 patients. Similarly, each tower can accommodate up to 2,458 patients in 886 apartments, Khawali added.The first stage of the construction was completed last month, with four apartment towers – towers 1, 3, 6, and 7 – being converted into makeshift hospital buildings for COVID-19 patients.President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo previously said the makeshift hospital would be ready to handle about 3,000 patients at a time. The 10-tower athletes village was built for the 2018 Asian Games, which Jakarta co-hosted with Palembang, South Sumatra.Khawali said the ministry also planned to convert existing treatment wards on several floors in tower 6 into intensive care units and emergency wards while the rest of the tower would be used as isolation wards for COVID-19 patients.“We expect the construction to be completed next Saturday, April 18,” he said.Jakarta is considered the epicenter of the outbreak in Indonesia, having recorded the highest number of confirmed cases and deaths among other 31 provinces across the archipelago.As of Wednesday afternoon, Jakarta had recorded at least 1,470 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 114 deaths caused by the disease.Topics :last_img read more